According to the US Congress, Apple should leave China

US Congress tells Apple to leave China Four MPs wrote a letter to Tim Cook. They accuse Apple of being “subservient to the Chinese Communist regime” and actively complicit in a regime that violates users’ privacy.

Apple Store in Shanghai

The relationship between Apple and China is very complex. Central KingdomOne of the company’s key markets American. And All its products are assembled there. Be it iPhone, Apple Watch, iPod or Mac. We are relatively familiar with companies that work with Apple, including Foxconn (Akka Han Hai Accuracy). So this company is firmly established in China. But for this, we have to deal with the government in that place, which leads to concessions, i.e. removing applications from the Chinese App Store, dissatisfying the existing authority in that place. Not everyone wants this kind of offer.

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They are all more in recent days. In fact, the American press revealed on May 19 that Apple had agreed to hand over a company controlled by Beijing to the management of its online services. Especially iCloud. Not only users of Chinese descent service, but everyone who connects with Apple service from China. A severe blow to the company that recommends respecting the privacy and security of the personal data of its customers.

US Congress tells Apple to leave China

Following this revelation, there are four members of the United States Congress Published a letter to Tim Cook, Apple’s boss. In the letter, which was posted on social media by one of the four signatories, lawmakers urged Apple to end its relationship with the Chinese government, but also with the Chinese companies that operate the company.

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MPs say Apple is surrendering by making all of these compromises Accomplice to privacy violation Users “feel they have Tim Cook.” Completely surrendered Against the Chinese Communist regime ”. Apple responded openly to this letter. The company explains that this only applies to the laws of the country and that it provides some data only when the Chinese government needs it. In addition, it denies unrestricted access to the personal data of its customers. I hope this is true.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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