New Netflix documentary investigates college admissions scandal

New Netflix documentary investigates college admissions scandal

A new Netflix documentary uses transcripts of actual conversations recorded by the FBI to recreate the revelations of the college admissions scandal. Said Mola Lengi.

Video transcript

A Netflix documentary was released overnight with new revelations of the college admissions scandal involving TV stars Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman. “Operation Varsity Blues” is what he calls it and features interviews and retweets of recorded conversations between admission counselor Rick Singer and his wealthy clients. According to Mola Lengi, this gives viewers a new perspective on Singer’s mood and those who worked with him.

John Vantemore: This is the saddest and most devastating phone call of my life.

Spring Lengi: In a recently released film, former Stanford sailing coach John Vantemore describes himself after being involved in a massive college admission scandal. Vandemore says Rick Singer never openly stated that he never had to be added to his list in order to get money for his school project.

John Vantemore: He said, hey, he wants to donate 000 160,000 right now, and will donate the rest to keep our relationship going. So I took it as a deposit rate, which makes me consider more people. Let’s see how it goes from there.

Spring Lengi: Vandemore was the first of nearly 60 people to face charges related to the $ 25 million project, including actress Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin. Wealthy parents paid Singer to bribe sports officials and to conduct standardized tests to enroll their children in high colleges. The film uses actors to recreate Singer’s phone conversations, which were taken vocabulary from FBI transcripts.

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I will treat you through the process.

Spring Lengi: In the scene, the singer chats with New York lawyer Gordon Kapil, who admits he paid 000 75,000 to someone to improve his daughter’s ACT score.

Mark will see all of your answers. Mark will take the exam and make sure he decides to get any score… What he can do is amazing.

Spring Lengi: The film shows how Singer parents discovered play participation for their children.

We can say that we have some track and field friends who are going to help you because you are an athlete.

But I can’t say that in front of my son because he knows he doesn’t.

Spring Lengi: It highlights their fear of being caught.

I have no interest in the moral issue here. I’m afraid she’ll get caught doing this, you know, she’s done. That’s when …

This never happened 20 years ago.

Spring Lengi: Of the nearly 60 people charged in the case, at least four continue to fight the charges. 42 have already pleaded guilty. Their sentences range from one day to nine months. CBS News Legal Analyst Ricky Clayman

Client Ricky: It looks like a sack that encloses with a drawstring.

Spring Lengi: Felicity Huffman was sentenced to two weeks in prison. Laough Flynn and her husband Mosimo Gianulli pleaded guilty last May. Laough Clin is two months old. Giannulli is serving a five-month prison sentence.

Client Ricky: Lori Lough Lynn and her husband had time to see what the other defendants pleaded guilty to and what their sentences were. They made it clear that he would not receive the most severe punishment here if he pleaded guilty.

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Spring Lengi: Clayman said Singer may be facing 65 charges, and he will serve less than 10 years because he helped lawyers. He will be condemned at last.

Client Ricky: The government does not want any event that requires the testimony of Rick Singer. So, they hang that carrot in front of Rick Singer because he knows he has to follow that path until the last moment.

Spring Lengi: “CBS This Morning,” Mola Lengi.

It is not a bar. It’s like that.

He follows the line. We have been trying to get an interview with Rick Singer for over a year. I would be very interested to hear what you have to say in all of this. But listening to the father, he said a …

I.e..

-Evaluation.

But they are text.

I.e..

These are text transcripts.

I do not care about the moral question. This is embarrassing.

Yes, we do not know how it was said. But if these are spoken words, it is difficult to change them beautifully.

Yes.

It’s not pretty.

How to do it in context, how to interpret it? You really can’t.

There is no explanation.

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About the Author: Timothea Maldonado

"Coffee practitioner. Lifelong web evangelist. Unapologetic internet enthusiast."

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