A further 3,197 COVID-19 cases and 6 deaths were reported in Utah on Sunday

A further 3,197 COVID-19 cases and 6 deaths were reported in Utah on Sunday

Salt Lake City – in its daily new release Corona virus According to statistics, the Utah Department of Health on Sunday reported a further 3,197 test-confirmed cases and six deaths.

As of Saturday, 13,641 people had been tested for the virus, and 556 were currently hospitalized due to COVID-19. About 200 of those patients, 197, are said to be in intensive care. More than 91% of the state’s ICU beds.

In total, this is 177,176 confirmed cases in Utah, 793 deaths, 7,532 hospitalizations and 1,906,908 trials conducted on 1,344,945 different individuals since the onset of the epidemic.

In an e-mail, the health department said six dead were dead:

  • The Davis County man, aged 65 to 84, was hospitalized when he died
  • Davis County woman, over 85, resident of a long-term care center
  • Salt Lake County man over 85 admitted to hospital
  • Salt Lake County man aged 65 to 84 admitted to hospital
  • Washington County man aged 45 to 64 admitted to hospital
  • Weber County woman aged 65 to 84 admitted to hospital

The state averaged 3,310 new cases a day last week and a positive test percentage of 23.5. Three months ago, Aug., 22nd, The state has an average of 354 cases per day for seven days and 8.7% positive tests.

Seventy-eight Uttans are said to have died from COVID-19 in the past week.

As Uttans prepares to celebrate Thanksgiving, the government has announced Guidelines And Suggestions For safe meetings. “The more people a person in a crowd communicates with from different homes, the closer the physical contact will be, and the longer the contact will last, the greater the risk to a person

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COVID-19 Guidelines say that he or she may spread the disease to others, whether they have symptoms or not. ” The safest option is to limit your celebrations to the people you live with and to include others almost. “

The government recommends keeping the gathering as small as possible, inviting only those people who are often outside the home, and avoiding many meetings with people from different backgrounds. “The host should have a list of names and contact information for anyone attending the meeting,” the recommendations say, “then if contact tracking is needed.”

This week

Method:

Test results now include data from PCR tests and antigen tests. Positive COVID-19 test results are reported to the health department as soon as they are confirmed, but negative test results are not reported within 24 to 72 hours.

The total number of cases reported by the Utah Department of Health each day since the outbreak in Utah, including the current victims, survivors and deaths.

Recovered cases are defined as those who have been infected with COVID-19 for three or more weeks and have not died.

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According to the Department of Health, deaths reported by the state usually occur two to seven days earlier. Some deaths may still be behind, especially if the person is from Utah, but dies in another state.

The Department of Health reports confirmed and possible COVID-19 case deaths within the case limits defined by the State Council and regional epidemiologists. The death toll is subject to change once the trial is over.

For deaths that are said to be COVID-19 deaths, the Department of Health says the person would not have died without COVID-19.

The data included in this story primarily reflect the state of Utah as a whole. For more localized data, visit your local health district website.

Information from the Utah Department of Health and coronavirus.utah.gov/case-counts. For more information on how the Utah Department of Health compiles and reports COVID-19 data, see coronavirus.utah.gov/case-counts Scroll to the “Data Notes” section at the bottom of the page.

Graham Dudley

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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