Northeast leaders plead not to be ‘forced’ into Tier 3 when entering Manchester lockout

Northeast leaders plead not to be 'forced' into Tier 3 when entering Manchester lockout

Northeastern leaders have urged the government to “look at local resources” before forcing the region into tier 3 locking operations.

Council bosses have begged ministers not to push the highest level of Covid 19 restrictions, as has now happened with Greater Manchester and South Yorkshire. The review was given last week To demonstrate that existing Tier 2 operations are working.

In Newcastle, leaders in Gateshead, Northumberland, North Dineside, South Dineside, Sunderland and County Durham say infection rates are declining here and there is “no significant pressure” on local hospitals.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson called on Greater Manchester on Tuesday Layer 3 locking, Amid fierce fighting with Metro Mayor Andy Burnham and other local leaders, talks broke down over a business support package.

South Yorkshire has become the latest region to be placed under Tier 3 restrictions today, but Health Secretary Matt Hankok has confirmed that “there are no immediate plans” to add the Northeast to the strict locking section.

In a statement released Wednesday morning, Northeastern leaders urged the public to “please do your best” to curb the virus and avoid drastic measures.

They added: “We know it’s hard to see and keep loved ones physically, enjoying a night out with friends in the theater or down the pub, but by not mixing houses, you make a difference by following the rules.

“We are disappointed that the Greater Manchester Tier 3 has been imposed without the agreed economic support, and we urge the government to engage with us and look at local evidence before forcing us down the same path.

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“Our public health directors are working closely together and we are seeing early signs of cases being leveled across the region.

“NHS colleagues have been working very hard to keep the services open and have not reported any significant pressures, yet we urge everyone to make proper use of the NHS services.

“We continue to work with the government. The latest data on the restrictions we introduced in the region on September 18 – before the national tiring system – seems to be having an impact.”

If ‘substantial’ food is not provided, bars and pubs will be forced to close if Northeast Layer 3 is placed under ‘very high’ restrictions.

Current restrictions in the region prohibit people from different homes from mixing indoors, but people can visit hotels and restaurants with their own homeowners or support the bubble.

Recent statistics show that the rate of infection is declining in most of the seven council areas, with an increase recorded only in County Durham and Sunderland.

Here are the latest figures for the seven days from October 16:

  • County Durham – 344.5 new cases per 100,000 people (compared to 317.5 in the seven days from October 9)
  • Upon Tyne in Newcastle – 334.5 (532.0)
  • Sunderland – 325.5 (301.0)
  • South Tyneside – 235.1 (263.6)
  • Gateshead – 227.2 (279.1)
  • Northern Tyneside – 200.6 (283.3)
  • Northumberland – 164.7 (196.0)

In their statement, Northeastern leaders said they would “continue to lobby strongly for a realistic package of economic support” and reiterated that local authorities should be given control over check and forensic efforts.

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They added: “It is imperative that we do not let our guard slip or fall into a false sense of security as we watch the slow-moving film. Doing so will undo all of your hard work.

“Over the past few weeks, the Northeast has been working together with the public, businesses, residents and communities to tackle the epidemic. We all need to continue to do our bit. Thank you.”

The report was released by Council Presidents Nick Forbes, Martin Cannon, Glenn Sanderson, Norma Redfiren, Ian Malcolm, Graeme Miller and Simon Henick, and North Four Dine Mayor Jamie Triscoll and Northampton Police and Crime Commissioner Kim McKinnes.

Mr Hancock told a public meeting on Tuesday: “We need to take action if necessary, but there are early signs that the number of cases in the Northeast is flat.

In the first case, it happens among young people, and I am still concerned about the number of cases of people over the age of 60, of course they are people who end up in the hospital or worse.

So, we will take care of the situation very carefully, but we do not have immediate plans to make a change, we had medical advice to change what we need to go urgently and then of course we will support it in the local area. ” ‘

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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