Pub and Brewer Marston Ax 2,150 Furlg Jobs | Business

Marston – 2,150 jobs
October 15: Murston, which owns nearly 1,400 pubs, restaurants, cocktail bars and hotels in the UK, says it will cut 2,150 jobs due to new Govt restrictions. The company has more than 14,000 employees.

Whitbread – 6,000 jobs
September 22: Whitbread, who owns Premier Inn’s Beeffeater and Brewer’s Fire chains, says it will cut 6,000 jobs at its hotels and restaurants, one-fifth of its workforce

Pizza Express – 1,100 jobs
September 7: The restaurant chain confirms the closure of 73 restaurants as part of a recovery restoration deal.

Costa Coffee – 1,650 jobs
September 3: The company, which was bought by Coca-Cola two years ago, is cutting 1,650 jobs in its cafes, more than one in 10 of them. The role of assistant store manager goes to all stores.

Brett A Manger – 2,890 jobs
August 27: Most of the cuts are centered around the sandwich chain’s store staff, but 90 characters will be lost in its support center ranks. The cuts include 1,000 job losses announced on July 6.

Marx & Spencer – 7,000 jobs
August 18: Food, clothing and homewares retailers cut jobs at the Central Support Center, regional management and stores.

M&C – 400 jobs
August 5: M&C closes 47 of its 215 stores, a refresher-based clothing retailer formerly known as McCas.

WH Smith – 1,500 jobs
August 5: The chain that sells products ranging from sandwiches to stationery will cut jobs, mainly at UK train stations and airports.

Dixon’s Carbon – 800 jobs
August 4: Electronics retailer Dixons Carbon cuts 800 managers in its stores.

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DW Sports – 1,700 jobs at risk
August 3: DW Sports falls into disarray, immediately shutting down its retail website and risking closing its 150 gyms and stores.

Marx & Spencer – 950 jobs
July 20: High Street Stallford cuts head office roles related to store management jobs and property and store operations.

Ted Baker – 500 jobs
July 19: Fashion retailer’s London headquarters, Ugly Brown building and about 200 utensils in the remaining stores.

Assuri – 1,200 jobs
July 17: Ask Italian and Gizzi Pizza chain owner closes 75 restaurants and only makes its pot lunch business distribution

Burberry – 500 jobs worldwide
July 15: A total of 150 posts are headquartered at UK headquarters as the luxury brand seeks to cut costs by $ 55 million after a slump in sales during the epidemic.

Boots – 4,000 jobs
9 July: Boots Cuts 4,000 jobs – or 7% of its staff – by closing 48 optical stations and reducing the number of staff at its head office in Nottingham, and by reducing some management and customer service roles in stores.

John Lewis – 1,300 jobs
July 9: John Lewis announces plans Close eight permanently Of its 50 stores, 1,300 jobs could be lost, including full-department stores in Birmingham and Watford.

Celtic Manor – 450 jobs
July 9: Employers at the Celtic Collection in Newport, which hosted the 2010 Golf Rider Cup and the 2014 NATO conference, say 450 of its 995 workers will lose their jobs.

Brett A Manger – 1,000 jobs
July 6: Brett A. Manger Close 30 branches permanently Covit-19 could cut at least 1,000 jobs after experiencing “significant operating losses” as a result of the lockout

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Ordinary Food Group – 1,900 jobs
July 2: Owner of Bella Italia, Cafe Rouge and Los Iguanas restaurant chains Collapsed in management, Will lose 1,900 jobs immediately. Many offers are on the table for certain areas of the business, but buyers do not want to buy all existing sites, and 91 of its 250 outlets will be closed permanently.

Arcadia – 500 jobs
July 1: Sir Philip Green’s intricate fashion team of Topshop, Miss Selbridge, Dorothy Perkins, Burton, Evans and Wallis says in July 500 head office jobs 2,500 in the coming weeks.

SSP Team – 5,000 jobs
July 1: Owner of Upper Crust and Coffee Ridasa Ax 5,000 jobs, After the epidemic paralyzed domestic and international travel, with cuts at its head office and operations in the UK, half of its staff.

Harrods – 700 jobs
July 1: Department Store Group Cutting one in seven Of its 4,800 employees due to the “continuous impacts” of the epidemic.

Harvis – 240 jobs
June 30: Administrators were done 240 redundancies At furniture chain Harvey, more than 1,300 jobs are at risk if the buyer is not found.

D.M. Levine – 600 jobs
June 30: T-shirt maker D.M. Levine It also closed its 66 outlets Permanently, with a loss of about 600 jobs.

Rainy season access – 545 jobs
June 11: There were fashion brands Purchased from management In June their founder Peter Simon signed a contract to permanently close 35 stores and lose 545 jobs.

Mulberry – 470 jobs
June 8: The luxury fashion and accessories brand is on the decline 25% of its global workforce And has begun a consultation with 470 employees at risk.

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Restaurant Group – 3,000 jobs
June 3: Owner of dining chains such as Wagamama and Frankie & Pennis closes most of Sigvito’s branches and its 11 food and fuel pubs, and 120 restaurants are permanently closed. Total job losses Can reach 3,000.

Clarks – 900 jobs
May 21: Clarks plans Reduce 900 office jobs It catches up with the growth of online shoe shopping and epidemics worldwide.

Oasis and Warehouse – 1,800 jobs
April 30: Fashion brands acquired by management from restructuring company Hilco in April All of their shops Permanently closed and 1,800 jobs lost.

Kath Kitston – 900 jobs
April 21: More than 900 jobs at retro retail label were immediately cut Kath Kidston After the company announced it would close all 60 of its UK stores permanently.

Debenhams – 4,000 jobs
April 9: At least 4,000 jobs will be lost at its head office in Debenhams and subsequently closed stores. Decline in management In April, for the second time in a year.

Laura Ashley – 2,700 jobs
March 17: Laura Ashley Collapsed in management, With 2,700 job losses, and recovery negotiations said to have been thwarted by the epidemic.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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