Electric 4×4 in the final version

Electric 4x4 in the final version

A truly antique 4×4 with 100% electric motorization, Bollinger wears its standard outfit, confirming its Land Rover Defender look.

In the world of electric cars, there are no longer SUVs, but real off-roaders are rare. Although the Mercedes EQC 4 × 4 is a prototype and VW has canceled its Rutge ID, Polinger is making progress with its first model.

Following the 2017 prototype, the Michigan-based US company has released a product version of its 4 × 4. Named the most relaxed P1 it gets a few evolutions, very elegantly with elevated beltline and new lighting. The radiator grille disappears into the front abacus, thanks to the integration of the reduced radiator, changing the faces slightly. This increases the size of the front ‘Frank’ trunk to 243 liters.

However, the 4.36-meter-long Bollinger, close to the first-generation Land Rover Defender, retains a much older look. Off-road capabilities are interesting, with a departure angle of 50 and an angle of attack of 43 of. For now, only the 5-door body will appear, while the narrower 3-doors were considered. Its P2 pick-up variant gets the same changes as the 1.83m body. Chassis version will be followed.

Performance to be noted

Since the engine is electric nothing technically changes. Thus we see a strange volume of 614 horsepower and 906 Nm of torque. The battery is also the largest in the US EPA cycle with a capacity of 142 kW for a distance of 320 km. Charging is currently promised at 100 kW, but Bollinger hopes it will climb to 150 kW by next year. Despite being 2.27 tons, the performance will be top notch at 0-100km / h in 4.5 seconds and will take place at a top speed of 160km / h.

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Primarily aimed at North America, the Bollinger B1 is in the booking stage for $ 1,000 (20 820). Price will be 5,000 125,000 or 3 103,000 due to low production volume.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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