A BUS-sized asteroid will fly closer to Earth tomorrow than the Moon

A BUS-sized asteroid will fly farther from Earth than the Moon tomorrow – and can be seen through a 12-inch telescope

  • Asteroid 2020 SW is about to cross Earth at a distance of 13,000 miles from the surface
  • This object is closer to Earth than the Moon at 240,000 miles
  • NASA experts say it should not have an impact, but if it does, the asteroid will break in the atmosphere and fall from the sky like a fireball
  • Those on the ground can see the asteroid using a telescope of 12
  • It will make its closest approach on Thursday, September 24 at 7:12 p.m.

An asteroid the size of a bus is set to fly closer to Earth on September 24.

Called the 2020 SW, the object will travel approximately 13,000 miles from Earth, closer to the moon and floating in space weather satellites.

Following the discovery of the asteroid by the NASA-funded Catalina Sky Survey in Arizona on September 18, follow-up observations determined that it was 15 to 30 feet wide and that ET would close at 7:12 p.m.

Experts say the 2020 SW is not in orbit with Earth, but if it does, the space rock will break in the atmosphere and become a fireball before hitting the surface.

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Paul Sodas, director of the Center for Near-Earth Object Research (CNEOS) at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JBL), said: ‘There are numerous asteroids like this, many of which approach our planet several times each year. ‘

‘In fact, asteroids of this size affect our atmosphere on average once every year or two.’

The JBL states that the asteroid will fly over the Earth more than the lunar orbits at a distance of about 240,000 miles and will create a closer approach below the ring of geostationary satellites orbiting about 22,000 miles from our planet.

In the past asteroids have developed close-flying objects to Earth, but those standing on the surface may have the opportunity to see the 2020 SW Vis.

Following the discovery of the asteroid by the NASA-funded Catalina Sky Survey in Arizona on September 18, follow-up observations determined that it was 15 to 30 feet wide and would approach its closure at 7:12 p.m.

Following the discovery of the asteroid by the NASA-funded Catalina Sky Survey in Arizona on September 18, follow-up observations determined that it was 15 to 30 feet wide and would approach its closure at 7:12 p.m.

Sodas said CNPS Even if the asteroid is too far away to see with the naked eye, amateur astronomers can capture a scene using a 12-inch telescope.

These telescopes are commonly used among stargazers and are powerful enough to see stunning colors in distant nebulae.

After showing its face on Thursday, the 2020 SW will continue its journey around the sun.

The asteroid is set to return to Earth in 2014, but will not come close to a single trip.

Scientists estimate that more than 100 million small asteroids, such as the 2020 SW, will fly in space, but they will be difficult to find unless they are close to Earth (stock).

Scientists estimate that more than 100 million small asteroids, such as the 2020 SW, will fly in space, but they will be difficult to find unless they are close to Earth (stock).

NASA was used by Congress in 2005 to identify at least 90 percent of near-Earth asteroids about 460 feet and above.

Scientists estimate that more than 100 million tiny asteroids, such as the 2020 SW, will fly in space, but they will be difficult to detect if they do not move close to Earth.

“The detection capabilities of NASA’s asteroid surveys are constantly improving, and we should expect to find them two days before asteroids of this size come close to our planet,” Sodas said.

Astronomers hunt asteroids above 450 feet because they can cause ‘catastrophic damage’

Researchers have discovered most asteroids as small as a kilometer, but are now looking for those about 459 feet (140 m) high – because they could cause catastrophic damage.

While no one knows when the next big impact will occur, scientists are pushing to predict – intercept – their arrival.

The artist's intention is to film

The artist’s intention is to film

Rolf Tenzing, President of the European Space Operations Center (ESOC) in Dormstad, ‘Sooner or later we will get … make a small or big impact’

This will not happen in our lifetime, but ‘the risk of the earth being affected in the event of a catastrophic event one day is very high,’ he said.

‘For now, there is very little we can do.’

READ  Greenland's ice has melted further than return, analyze suggests | Earth News

Source: AFP

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Wayne Ma is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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