New York bespoke $ 300 custom masks are coming off the shelves

New York bespoke $ 300 custom masks are coming off the shelves

He’s making PPE for VIP.

Brooklyn-based tailor Yosel Tiefenbrun is used to making custom $ 8,000 suits for men that may take about 80 hours of work to build. But these days, the Crown Heights-based sewing superstar is shifting gears: making masks as they sell for up to $ 300 each.

“We have to stay safe, but if you are going to use [a mask]You could also wear it in style, “Tiefenbrun, 30, tells The Post.” You want to look good on it. “

Tiefenbrun, an Orthodox Jew with glasses with a hipster touch of haute couture, is joining the ranks of luxury designers who are taking advantage of the new need for stylish protective equipment, as his most dazzling efforts are in the background due to the coronavirus .

While most Tiefenbrun orders are for the $ 50 face cover versions, Tiefenbrun also offers a $ 300 luxury option, hand-stitched and custom-designed using exclusive patterns that require a Skype session for the design. All are made from cotton imported from Italy and feature perfect stitching.

Tiefenbrun, a New York native who grew up in London, became a rabbi in Singapore, but received a second call after studying at Savile Row Academy. He then launched his self-titled business in New York City three and a half years ago, and was the subject of a GQ profile sprouting this past September. But when the pandemic hit, business stopped for the famous tailor, who has a team of six employees in his East Williamsburg workshop.

“We were having our peak when we got in right now,” he says. “We spent two months with virtually no sales of suits. . . We said, ‘OK, we can wait and keep it closed.’ “

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As the running of the bulls dragged on, he and his staff turned to function, becoming fashionable.

“Now we have long, full days, starting early, ending late. I feel like I’m starting a new business. It’s a different ball game. “

The father of two is especially grateful for the new opportunity as he survived a COVID-19 case in March that left him “out of service for a week.”

“Once I had my antibody tested, that’s when I decided to try and keep my business alive,” he says, referring to tests that could indicate that a person has fought the virus, but they are not yet a proven immunity passport. .

Now, his company’s motto, “Cloth for Every Occasion,” is being tested. And New Yorkers seem eager to put their money where their mouth is. In the last 10 days or so since he received orders for masks, he has been buried in requests.

“It was raining, messages left, right and center on social media,” says Tiefenbrun. Last week, an order for 30 masks arrived: half male, half female, all seers.

Another invaluable feature of your new specialty? It is perfect for bearded men and with glasses. The masks are specifically designed to relieve pressure on the beard. They are also contoured to the nose to minimize fogging of the glasses.

And while their shirts can cost up to around $ 600, the relatively affordable masks are finally giving their fans a chance to own an affordable piece of clothing in their studio.

“Yosel’s work is very artistic, but it’s too elegant for me,” says Moshe Frank, a businessman from Crown Heights, who loves his hand-sewn green mask. “This is the first affordable piece I could have.”

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Even though he hasn’t saved up for a Tiefenbrun suit yet, Bentzy Plotkin, a 32-year-old Crown Heights film producer loves his $ 50 green and blue seersucker mask, which doesn’t tarnish his glasses. “I want to make sure I stay in business so that when I do it right I can buy a suit,” he says.

Tiefenbrun customers also say the high price is more palatable since they aren’t exactly going out into town these days.

“People used to say that shoes are the most important thing,” says Frank. “Now a mask is what you spend your money on.”

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About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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