iOS 15: Apple strengthens email confidentiality

iOS 15: Apple strengthens email confidentiality

Apple’s new feature is also available in MacOS Montessori.

With its two new operating systems, Apple is once again strengthening the privacy of its users. At the moment, there is no question about ad tracking outside of apps, but it is about tracking emails. Cupertino has decided to block the opportunity for companies to collect information about users when they open an email.

During their email campaigns, advertisers insert a small element into the messages they send, to see if they are open or not. This way they can tell if the campaign has acted more or less.

Often, this telecommunication is done through loading images while viewing an email, informing the advertiser that his email was viewed by his target. In some cases, tracking pixels are used. These are hidden in emails and allow the advertiser to gather more information about you again. The tracking pixel may also record your IP address and other personal data, indicating that you have opened the ad email.

After all, these pixels are the target of Apple’s new policy. The US company is actually coming forward to block these types of elements in order to protect their privacy for its users. A special option will appear on iOS 15 and MacOS 12.

It must be activated manually as it is not enabled by default. To do this, once you have installed the latest version of iOS, go to Settings and then send the mail. In the “Privacy Protection” tab, enable “Protect Email Function”. On Mac, go to Mail> Mail Options> Privacy and enable “Protect Mail Function”.

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When enabled, this feature will hide your IP address when you open an email. Apple You ” Assigns an approximate IP address that only applies to the area where your device is located », Refers to an American company.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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