Apple strengthens supply chain security to prevent leakage

Apple strengthens supply chain security to prevent leakage

Apple is taking steps to control the leakage of its new products.

Technology companies continue to suffer from leaks. Photos or videos of current projects or hitherto unpublished products are often found on the web. This is especially the case with Apple. We can no longer count the number of stolen photos of iPhone or iPod prints, shells and other prototypes shared on the Internet. And if It somehow serves the interests of the American company, Apple still seems to want to control this phenomenon.

According to the internal document recovered by the site Information, Apple has actually made a number of changes to its security regulations within its factories and distribution chains.

First, it is a question of checking the criminal background of all workers in Apple’s factories. First for the American company. The latter want to increase the number of surveillance cameras within its facilities to control risks and identify those involved in leaks.

Second, Apple wants to strengthen the security system during the “operation of critical areas in factories”. Therefore, if an area takes “unusually long time to reach its goal”, a security alert may be triggered.

Then, Apple wants to strengthen the computer security system set up in some factories. The system collects and analyzes data to verify that the time it takes to produce a particular component is normal. This should allow for parts to be stolen without being able to prevent leakage.

The guards at the checkpoints must keep “detailed records of the movement of workers moving important areas from one area to another.” Workers must present their identity card to claim who they are.

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Videos that destroy defective prototypes and parts should now be kept for 180 days. This way, in case of doubt, Apple will have 3 months to check if the defective prototypes and other components are actually destroyed.

Finally, the US company has decided to ban its suppliers from collecting biometric data – face scans and fingerprints – from its employees. However, even though they actually work to supply Apple, they are still allowed to do this to their own employees. One feature that Apple is most surprised about is that it makes confidentiality one of its core policies and struggles.

These new guidelines should ensure better security and privacy for Apple. It remains to be seen whether this will be sufficient. Product related leaks are really numerous. If more conclusive evidence does not appear on the web – photo or video – the rumor may still be based on “hearing”. This is already the case.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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