The endurance ride of Mars gets the first driving sounds on the Red Planet

The endurance ride of Mars gets the first driving sounds on the Red Planet

NASA He released the first vehicle records Tuesday.

The alloy wheels of the Mars diligence rover hit the rocky terrain, and they were heard on two recently released audio tracks.

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Two copies of the 90-foot voyage on March 7 were recorded using vehicle entry, landing and landing gear (EDL). Microphone – It was given to the public Wednesday press release.

First Edition Raw Cut. For more than 16 minutes, listeners can hear the cruise and the sound of loud scratches Engineers It is thought that this may be caused by electromagnetic interference or its suspension and contact between the surface.

The output indicates that the EDL microphone is subject to limited testing prior to start-up, not for ground operations.

The second version lasts only 90 seconds and filters out some noise from the unfiltered area.

The Mars Rover Super Camera provides first readings to identify rock targets

“If I hear these noises while driving, I’m going to ask my car to pull over,” said Dave Kruls, chief engineer of the camera and sub-microphone system. You ask, it makes perfect sense where it was recorded. “

On March 10, NASA released the Supercam microphone clips The wind of Mars And the sound of the laser device The opening rocks You may ask.

Since then, diligence has been widely tested It landed on Mars on February 18th In preparation for upcoming trips.

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Rover begins searching for suitable aircraft for Mars discovery helicopter to test its first aircraft tests, NASA’s Jet Engine Laboratory on Wednesday Advertise She chose a site.

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Then he will begin to look for and tolerate the old symptoms Microbial life Seriously.

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About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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