ISS on removal of cracks in Russian territory

ISS on removal of cracks in Russian territory
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A team from the International Space Station (ISS) is drilling the edges of a crack in the Russian block Svesta, which caused an air leak, which NASA says will help stop its expansion.

In October, astronauts discovered it in an intermediate chamber Block star A crack 4.5 cm long, which was temporarily closed with a flexible disk made of rubber and aluminum foil. On Wednesday, it was said that the crew would seal the crack next week.

“The crew marked the edges of the crack and cracked the casting for future drilling,” according to a report on NASA’s website.

Problems with ISS

In September 2019 Was Recorded a small air leak in the ISS. Team in 2020 Found And fixed a crack temporarily in the intermediate chamber of the Svesta block. At the time, they told Spotnik in Roscosmos that this crack did not pose a danger to the station or the crew. It was later revealed that there may have been at least six cracks in the Svesta intermediate chamber.

Due to the leak, it resembles a hole with a diameter of 0.2 mm, the air pressure at the station drops by 0.4 mm of mercury per day, but it is far from the emergency values ​​- from 0.5 mm at. The ISS must be constantly pressurized with air, nitrogen and oxygen to compensate for the leak. Their products are available at ISS and they are transported by cargo from Earth.

There may be at least six cracks in the Russian connection that allow air to escape to the International Space Station (ISS) Block star, The first of which will be fixed next week, according to the team’s talks with Earth broadcast by NASA.

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Russians Sergei Ryzykov and Sergei Good-Sverkov, American astronauts Kathleen Rubins, Michael Hopkins, Victor Clover and Shannon Walker, and Japanese Sochi Nokuchi are currently on the ISS.

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About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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