Navalny’s imprisonment – Opposition Navalny – World News – Union splits

Navalny's imprisonment - Opposition Navalny - World News - Union splits

The founder of a party hostile to the Kremlin called on the Russians to withdraw from imprisoned opposition.

Russian opposition REATERS split over novelty / photo

The Russian opposition wants to win seats in parliament by mobilizing voters angry over the imprisonment of Alexei Navalny. But the plan has already been hit hard by clashes within the opposition.

As he writes Reuters, The founder of the anti-Kremlin Yabloko party called for the withdrawal of Navalny, who has become the most important opposition politician since the arrest of the Russians.

“Everyone must decide for themselves whether or not to support Navalny. But it is important to understand that democratic Russia, the people and life and respect without fear and oppression do not fit Navalny’s policy,” said Horihori Yavlinsky, a racist and authoritarian nationalist.

Read this tooBBC: Navalny’s imprisonment is the beginning, not the end of the Kremlin’s problemsRussia will hold parliamentary elections in September. And Navalny’s allies plan to encourage people to vote tactfully. But Yavlinsky’s comments caused controversy in the Yabloko party. In addition, imprisoned opposition allies are now demanding that the party expel its founder.

Fights began in the Russian section of social networks. Some users attack Yavlinsky, while others support him. But all of this calls into question Russia’s ability to unite. Despite not getting enough votes to enter parliament, officials in the past allowed the Yabloko party to run in elections. Meanwhile, applications for party registration from Navalny’s associates continue to be rejected.

Some Yabloko members have criticized Yalinsky, accusing him of sidelining voters at a time when people expect political support after the protests.

“Either our party can represent these people, or we will go without voters. This is oxygen for political forces,” said Lev Schlosberg, an influential party member.

Read this tooNavalny’s wife leaves Russia – mediaYevgeny Roycemann, the former mayor of Yekaterinburg against the Kremlin, said the Yabloko party list could no longer run for parliament. Others argue that it was wrong to criticize Navalny when he became a political prisoner.

The opposition’s confrontation sheds light on the growing skepticism among Navalny and Kremlin critics about his ability to be a leader. In particular, many were wary of his unacceptable comments. The Yabloko party expelled him in 2007 for “nationalist activism.”

Navalny, who took part in rallies of radical nationalists and spoke harshly about people of non-Russian descent, insisted that the real reason for his expulsion was his desire to leave Yavlinsky.

Navalny’s detention and arrest in Russia are well known

  • Navalny returned to Moscow from Germany on January 17, where he was treated for poisoning in the summer of 2020.
  • His plane was about to land at Wunukovo Airport, but was diverted to Sheremetio. He was immediately detained by police at the airport under border control.
  • Navalny was detained by the Federal Penitentiary Service in Moscow to avoid appearing in prison on probation as a suspended offender.
  • On January 18, the court arrested the opposition until February 15.
  • On February 2, 2021, at the request of the FSVP, Moscow’s Simanowski court transferred Alexei Navalny during a field meeting in Moscow City Court. The conditional period for real is 3.5 years In the case of Yves Rocher. Altogether, Navalny, by decision, had to spend two years and eight months in a common-rule colony.

Read the latest news on Ukraine and the world on the Union Channel Telegraph

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Will Smith

About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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