Seventh body found in landslide. “We don’t know if we’re walking on the ground.”

Seventh body found in landslide.  "We don't know if we're walking on the ground."

Norwegian rescuers on Sunday evening found the seventh body of a landslide victim. That day, it was reported that the bodies of two people had been reached.

Authorities confirmed the identities of the three victims. They are 31 and 40 year old males and 54 year old female. Their bodies were found in earlier days.

The search for the three missing persons is ongoing. Initially, 26 people were searched, but most of the missing were found elsewhere.

“We don’t know if we’re walking on the ground.”

“As long as we believe we can find people alive, the rescue operation will continue,” said Iver Myrbo of the Norwegian Police. “The search is not without danger,” said Kenneth Wangan of the fire department. “We do not know if we’re walking on the ground,” he stressed.

Askil landslide site is the ruins of houses in a semi-solid clay mass. Pieces of furniture and car parts protrude from the floor.

Rescue teams move on mats, tracking dogs to help locate people. Two of them were injured as a result of the operations carried out. Earlier, the rescue operation was carried out mainly by helicopters and drones as further landslides were likely to occur. It also uses thermal imaging cameras.

Injured, damaged houses

On Wednesday morning, part of the city of Ask near Oslo collapsed to the ground, leaving some houses hanging on the edge of the landslide. No details of the gender or age of the deceased have been released.

At least 10 people were injured and 31 collapsed houses and nine buildings were destroyed in the disaster. More than a thousand were evicted. Victims are going to be collecting much needed things for those who have lost all of their possessions.

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Rescue teams work with dogs at the site of the landslide. Earlier, the rescue operation was carried out mainly by helicopters and drones as further landslides were likely to occur. Thermal imaging cameras were also used.

The hole is 700 meters long and 300 meters wide. There are clay deposits in the Asku region. Recently, it rained heavily in this part of Norway.

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About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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