Turkish scientist Ashok. Dr. Keihan leads Goldtech’s team in the United States: Will the mystery of the black hole be solved?

Turkish scientist Ashok.  Dr.  Keihan leads Goldtech's team in the United States: Will the mystery of the black hole be solved?

According to Coltech, this process involves two black holes orbiting each other. As they orbit each other, each blackout emits gravitational waves, and as they get closer to each other, stronger waves. If gravitational waves propagate somehow asymmetrically, the velocity also develops in a certain direction. If these waves travel at high speeds in one direction, the object must move in the other direction. In this case, the object in question is the (binary or combined) black hole, which is not found in the center of the galaxy.

The scientist says complex calculations are needed to determine how fast the recession is. But the best estimates will raise the maximum value to over 5,000 kilometers per hour (1.7 percent of the speed of light).

“This is enough to get the black hole out of the galaxy and lose it,” Goldteck said.

“So the black hole begins to travel through intergalactic space.”

According to theoretical calculations, the only logical explanation for a bright galaxy cluster to lose its miraculous black hole is that it is ejected from the galaxy. Burke-Spolar cites this possibility as follows:

“It’s very difficult to move something with billions of times the mass of the sun.”

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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