Fishing boat washed up in Japan after 10 years lost in tsunami | Japan disaster

A fishing boat has reappeared on shore Japan Nearly a decade after being swept into the Pacific – and up to the west coast of the United States – a massive tsunami has killed thousands of people and triggered a nuclear disaster.

The Small boat found off Hachizho Island Earlier this month, nine years and nine months later, 650 km. [403 miles] North.

The March 2011 tsunami, triggered by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake, killed more than 18,000 people and devastated much of the coast.

A local fishing cooperative confirmed that the 5.5-meter fiberglass boat once belonged to the Casenuma Fishing Navy, after verifying its registration number, Minichi Shimpan said.

The large coral reef found inside the boat before it ended up in Hachizho, 300 km south of Tokyo, has sparked speculation about where it went.

A local expert quoted by Minichi, it may have been transported across the Pacific to an area near the U.S. West Coast, after which it was transported to Southeast Asia at the northern equator, which flows east to west. The Croatian current flowing north may have brought the ship “home” later Japan, Said the expert.

Many debris traveled long distances across the Pacific after the tsunami, and its height and power contributed to the dissolution of the reactor. Fukushima Daisy Atomic Power Station.

In April 2012, a year later Three disasters, A couple living on Middleton Island in the Gulf of Alaska have discovered a football ball whose identities have been identified as belonging to a school in Iowa, one of the three provinces hardest hit by the tsunami.

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That same month, a U.S. Coast Guard sank a fishing boat off the coast of Alaska off the coast of Japan, considering it a danger to shipping.

In May of that year, Harley-Davidson lost the tsunami Washed 6,430 km off the Canadian island. The rusty motorcycle was found in a large white container, identified by its owner Ikuo Yokoyama with its number plate.

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Will Smith

About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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