The Etta landslide is the fourth tropical storm to hit Florida

The Etta landslide is the fourth tropical storm to hit Florida

Tropical storm Etta caused a landslide near Cedar Key early Thursday morning. This is the fourth hurricane landslide and the second Florida landslide. The National Hurricane Center said the storm caused a landslide in Cedar Key around 4 p.m. At 7 a.m., tropical storm Etta felt the effects of Etta’s East Coast, causing strong winds in Wollia County, 10 miles west of Keynesville, and the storm continued to slow down to 45 miles per hour following rain. . Tropical cyclone winds in West Florida and heavy rain on Wednesday. Authorities in St. Petersburg, Sarasota and Madeira Beach have already responded to reports that the roofs were torn and streets flooded. >>> Track storms with WESH 2 News appEta briefly intensified into a hurricane Wednesday morning, but then weakened to a tropical storm, the National Hurricane Center said. Hurricane surveillance has been removed for some parts of Florida’s West Coast, but tropical storm warnings are in place from Englewood to the Swanni River. Summer, Marion, Lake and Polk districts are still under tropical storm warnings. >>> School Closures Due to Tropical Storm Most parts of western and central Florida will receive 1 to 3 inches of rain until Thursday, except for tropical storm-wind and hurricane-force gases. Most of Florida’s West Coast will be affected by typhoon 2 to 5 feet, including the most vulnerable part of Tampa Bay. Water levels are already 2 to 3 feet above normal and water will continue to accumulate over the next few hours. Etta was the first to make landfall in Central America last week, followed by Type 4 hurricanes and then in Cuba and the Lower Metcombe Kiev late Sunday. The NHC said the storm would dissipate into the western Atlantic Ocean by the end of the week. PHN0eWxlPi5lbWJlZC1yYWRhciB7IGNsZWFyOiBib3RoOyBoZWlnaHQ6IDEwMHZ3OyB9IEBtZWRpYSBvbmx5IHNjcmVlbiBhbmQgKG1pbi13aWR0aDogNDEuMjVyZW0pIHsgLmVtYmVkLXJhZGFyIHsgaGVpZ2h0OiA1MDBweDsgfSB9PC9zdHlsZT4KPHNjcmlwdCB0eXBlPSJ0ZXh0L2phdmFzY3JpcHQiIHNyYz0iaHR0cHM6Ly93aWRnZXRzLWx0cy5tZWRpYS53ZWF0aGVyLmNvbS93eHdpZGdldC5sb2FkZXIuanM / +

READ  Condition Section watchdog resigns in one more shake-up at IG’s office environment

Tropical storm Etta caused a landslide near Cedar Key early Thursday morning. This is the fourth hurricane landslide and the second Florida landslide.

The National Hurricane Center said the storm caused a landslide in Cedar Key around 4 p.m.

A strong wind blew across Volusia County as Etta headed east

Floser Beach feels the effects of tropical storm Etta

As of 7 a.m., the storm was 10 miles west of Gainesville and the wind was blowing at a maximum speed of 45 mph as it continued to rain.

Tropical cyclone winds in West Florida and heavy rain on Wednesday. Authorities in St. Petersburg, Sarasota and Madeira Beach have already responded to reports that the roofs were torn and streets flooded.

>>> Track storms with the WESH 2 News app

The National Hurricane Center said Eta briefly strengthened to a hurricane on Wednesday morning, but then weakened to a tropical storm. Hurricane surveillance has been removed for some parts of Florida’s West Coast, but tropical storm warnings are in place from Englewood to the Swanni River. Summer, Marion, Lake and Polk districts are still under tropical storm warnings.

>>> School closures due to tropical storm Etta

Most parts of western and central Florida will receive 1 to 3 inches of rain until Thursday, except for tropical storm-wind gusts and hurricane-force gases.

Most of Florida’s West Coast will be affected by typhoon 2 to 5 feet, including the most vulnerable part of Tampa Bay. Water levels are already 2 to 3 feet above normal and water will continue to accumulate over the next few hours.

READ  How does mail-in voting work?

Etta first made landfall in Central America last week, a Type 4 hurricane, and then in Cuba and the Lower Medumbe Kiev late Sunday.

The NHC said the storm would dissipate over the weekend in the western Atlantic.

Tracking & # x20; The & # x20; Tropical & # x20; Radar

And

You May Also Like

Will Smith

About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *