Denmark plans to pull up to 17 million mink to stop the modified corona virus

Denmark plans to pull up to 17 million mink to stop the modified corona virus

Denmark, the world’s largest producer of mink furs, plans to remove all electricity in the country in order to keep the novel corona virus in a mutated form.

Prime Minister Matteo Frederickson said on Wednesday that the decision was taken “with a heavy heart” but was necessary based on the recommendation of health officials.

“The virus has changed in Ming. The virus has spread to humans, “said Frederickson.

The Stanz Serum Institute, a Danish official based in Copenhagen that treats infectious diseases, has detected five cases of the virus in mink farms and 12 examples in humans, which showed low sensitivity to antibodies, he said. Allowing the virus to spread will reduce the effectiveness of future vaccines.

“We have a huge responsibility on our own people, but with the mutation that has now been discovered, we have an even bigger responsibility on other parts of the world,” Frederickson said.

Officials estimate that there are between 15 million and 17 million mink in Denmark. Despite repeated attempts to cut down infected animals since June, the corona virus outbreak continues on the country’s mink farms.

One million mink Suspicious or confirmed farm infection within a radius of five miles (8.4 km) was wiped out in October. Frederickson said Denmark’s police, military and home guard would be laid off. Mink was also taken in the Netherlands and Spain after infections were discovered there.

The Prime Minister said new restrictions would be introduced on the spread of the deadly virus in some parts of Denmark.

“Unfortunately, residents in those municipalities need to be prepared for more restrictions in the future,” he said.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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