The world’s smallest bench 3D-printing shows what can be done for “micro vimmers”

The world's smallest bench 3D-printing shows what can be done for "micro vimmers"

We have said it before, but we are wary of any exaggerated claims that come our way. Claims of “world’s fastest” or “world’s first” always seem to be quickly removed, but when claiming ownership “The world’s smallest bench” The backup is taken by two dozen duckboats E – Goalie It will be difficult to find a place and we are very comfortable in it.

Of course the lower scale is not only printed for its sake, but is also a part of proving the possibility of “microwimmers”, artificial particles designed to move freely under microscopic regimes. As described in A paper [Rachel P. Doherty] And others From the Soft Matter Physics Laboratory at Leiden University, microwimmers with sizes ranging from 10 to 20 m can be reproduced and a small portion of the platinum catalyst added. The catalyst is the engine of the microwimmer; Hydrogen peroxide in the atmosphere decomposes on the surface of the catalyst and provides a driving force.

Synthetic micro vimmers have been around for a while, but most are made by chemical or evaporation methods, resulting in the formation of simple shapes such as stems and spheres. The present work describes the most complex shapes – the bench was a flexible one because the most effective microwimmers were simple helicopters, which mainly rotated themselves in the surrounding fluid. The printing method is based on two-photon polymerization (2PP), a non-linear optical process that polymerizes an adhesive when two photons are simultaneously absorbed.

The idea that a small running machine can be designed and manufactured so small is fantastic. We would like to see how control methods can be incorporated into prints – Microfluidics, Maybe?

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Wayne Ma is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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