“Heat bombs” melt ice

En 2018, des chercheurs ont, pour la première fois, été les témoins d’un événement de subduction d’eau chaude sous la couche superficielle froide de l’océan Arctique. Parmi les instruments utilisés pour l’analyser, ce dériveur. © San Nguyen, Institut océanographique Scripps

In the Arctic, sea ice melts faster than samples predict. Today researchers can provide an explanation. Questionable: More and more “heat bombs” are coming from the Pacific Ocean.

With Global warming, Arctic ice melting. It’s not a scoop. But today, Researchers at the University of Bangkok (United Kingdom) and the University of San Diego (United States) tell a little more about an event that was a mystery until then: the existence of real “bombs” Heat It speeds up Source Sea ice from below.

Keep in mind that researchers find it difficult to predict how Speed The Arctic sea ice Melting under global warming. In particular, complex local feedback between ice, sea and atmosphere. But these latest works are the highlight LightThe importance of the role of the sea. When they show how warm water flows from the Pacific Ocean to the Arctic Ocean.

Hot water from the Pacific

The Arctic Ocean, unlike other oceans in the world, is hierarchical Salinity. It gives a layer of cold water and a little salt on the surface. Effect of river flow and ice melting. Now, hot water is coming from himPacific Ocean Via the Bering Strait. More and more in the last decade. If the Arctic surface is slightly saltier and denser than water, it will sink. The creation of hot water pockets that researchers have seen over the past decade is growing strongly.

These “heat bombs” are stable enough to last for months or even years. Time to head north under the layer of sea ice. And these frosts gradually but surely become unstable as they release their excess heat. What evidence should be added to the long list already drawn by researchers that we will soon know the Arctic Ocean No snow For most of the year.

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About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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