IKEA will repurchase some used furniture to stop ‘over-consumption’

IKEA will repurchase some used furniture to stop 'over-consumption'

Determine the status value of the item to be resold to Ikea.

Ikea furniture in “new” condition without scratches can get 50 percent off the original price, the release said. Furniture in “excellent” condition with minor scratches can fetch up to 40 percent of the original price, and “well-used” items, with multiple scratches, can fetch up to 30 percent of the original price. Items will be resold in the “As-Is” section of the store.

The company said any items that cannot be resold will be recycled or donated to local community projects.

While this project has aroused interest among IKEA lovers, not all of the company’s furniture products are worthy of it. Program-acceptable items include dressers, bookshelves and wardrobe units, small tables, cabinets, dining tables and desks, chairs without mattresses and chests of drawers and drawers.

This initiative is in stark contrast to the aggressive marketing campaign used by IKEA in the early 2000s, and encourages consumers to change products frequently and discredit the company for selling.Disposable furniture. ”In a 2002 ad, a woman carries an old light bulb in the pouring rain while playing the piano.

“Many of you feel bad for this lamp,” he said. A man suddenly says in a Swedish accent. “It simply came to our notice then. It makes no sense, the new is so much better. ”

Nearly 20 years later, the company has embraced sustainability, which Peter Zelkeby, IKEA UK and Ireland Country Retail Manager, called “the defining issue of our time.” The company is committed to being part of the solution to promote sustainable consumption and combat climate change, he said.

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Hege Chabjorson, Sustainability Manager for IKEA UK and Ireland, said “being round” was a good business opportunity and a responsibility, and that the climate crisis should make everyone seriously reconsider their consumption habits.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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