Pinterest controls search results for culturally irrelevant Halloween ideas

Pinterest controls search results for culturally irrelevant Halloween ideas

Social media site Pinterest announced on Thursday that it would limit recommendations for Halloween costumes, which can be considered culturally insensitive.

Photo Sharing Company Posted a statement on its website Announcing the move, he added that it would be banned.Advertisements with culturally inappropriate clothing, and making it possible later to report culturally insensitive content from the pins. ”

The platform also said that some searches, including “Day of the Dead Clothes”, will guide users on how to “celebrate with thought and respect” the information created by experts and the Pinterest staff team PIndigenous.

“Clothing is consistently the most sought after word, but many are unaware that some clothing is a quote from other cultures,” Pinterest wrote in a statement. “As a platform for positivity, we want to make it easier to find culturally relevant Halloween ideas, and raise awareness that clothing should not be an opportunity to transform a person’s identity into a unique image.”

In this announcement, Pinterest also highlights the policy changes that have been implemented in recent years to prevent sensitive content and misinformation on the platform. In 2018, Pinterest announced the cessation of political advertising, and in 2020 launched a search engine for information on COVID-19.

In August, The company added its first black member To its board of directors following allegations of racial discrimination from two black ex-employees. Women were said to have experienced unfair pay, racism and retaliation.

Earlier that month, Francois Brooker, the former CEO of Pinterest, filed a lawsuit alleging that the company was pro-gender and abusive.

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Pinterest employees also began a digital boycott of the workplace, In a statement, “All forms of discrimination and retaliation on Pinterest should be stopped, even when not planned.”

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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