Milky Way Sound | [Listen] NASA converts galaxy telescope data into sound

Milky Way Sound | [Listen] NASA converts galaxy telescope data into sound

Location | Image Credit: Pixie & nbsp

Key Highlights

  • This sonification of the Galactic Center is part of NASA’s Learning Universe (UoL) program
  • This allows space enthusiasts to hear the center of the Milky Way

We have seen images and videos of our Milky Way galaxy captured by telescopes, but now for the first time NASA (National Aeronautics Space Administration) has provided the opportunity to hear the sound of the Milky Way galaxy. Translates data into audio.

NASA’s Chandra X-ray Center is leading the certification program as part of the Space Agency’s Learning Universe (UOL) program. It allows space enthusiasts to hear the center of the Milky Way (called the Galactic Center) as seen in X-ray, optical and infrared light.

In the video below, the cursor moves across the image, indicating the position and brightness of the sound sources.

“The translation starts on the left side of the image and moves to the right, with sounds indicating the position and brightness of the sources. The light of the objects located at the top of the image is heard as high pitches, while the intensity controls the light level.”

“The crescent occurs when we reach the bright right at the bottom right of the image. This is where the 4 million solar-mass supermassive black hole in the center of the galaxy, called Sagittarius A * (A-Star), was mentioned by NASA in its official blog post, where clouds of gas and dust are bright.

In addition to translating audio data from the Galactic Center, the project has created sonified versions of the supernova remnants of Cassiopeia A, or Case A, and the “Pillars of Creation” located in Messier 16.

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Wayne Ma is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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