Video Games, Chocolate, Lego: How Kids Spend Their Payments During Locking

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Parents know that teaching children to manage to spend money can be a real headache. Comic books, sweets, many of the experiments, and they were even more so during the lockout. One study looked at how British and American children have spent their pocket money since the onset of the epidemic. Not surprisingly, many are falling for video games like “Fortnight” and Roblox.

Roostermany’s application conducted the “Child Payment Report” survey between April and June, which included 40,000 children in the United States and 24,000 children in the United Kingdom between the ages of 4 and 14.

Although American children receive more pocket money per week than British children (91 8.91 and about 00 6.00), they have all spent some of their savings on video games in prisons over the past few months.

The only notable difference: British kids love the online gaming platform Roblox, while their American counterparts love the very popular “Fortnight”.

Lego ranks third in the list of children’s major expenses during the lockout for Americans and UK.

Although the latter invested their pocket money in books and sweets, Americans aged 4 to 14 preferred to use it for “mincraft” or gifts.

The RoosterMoney utility study explains that between the restricted access to shops and malls and the fact that children are spending more time at home, their transition from physics to the digital world has accelerated in recent months.

Saving generation?

Although British and American children spent their pocket money on video games and other toys during the lockout, they were also surprisingly frugal. British children were able to save 43.5% compared to 41% of their American relatives.

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“As we have accelerated our move to become a cashless society over the past few months, it is not just in our own spending habits, [those] Roostermany CEO Will Carmichael noted in a press release that the ability to “motivate” children to preserve. J.P.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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