AstraZeneca suspends corona virus vaccine test after ‘unexplained illness’ in UK participant

A coronavirus vaccine gets underway in Florida

Clinical testing of a high-grade corona virus vaccine from AstraZeneca has been suspended, with one of the UK participants suffering from “unexplained disease,” a company report said.

Although the participant was suspected of having a “serious” adverse reaction, the initial report stated that the disease was not caused by the vaccine. Point.

“As part of randomized, controlled global trials of the Oxford Corona virus vaccine, our standard review process prompted the suspension of the vaccine to review safety data,” the report said.

“This is a routine process that should take place whenever there is a disease that is not described in one of the tests, and when it is investigated, it ensures that we maintain the integrity of the tests.”

Citing two people familiar with the matter, the researchers were told to stop the investigation with “plenty of caution” while the findings have an impact on other experiments carried out by AstraZeneca and other vaccine manufacturers. Point.

The UK is among the signatories to buy millions of doses of AstraZeneca if a successful vaccine is developed, which is currently in phase 3 trials at dozens of sites across the UK, US, Brazil and South Africa.

Developed in collaboration with the University of Oxford, the Astrogenega vaccine is backed by the US government’s Operation Warp Speed, which accelerates growth with $ 1.2 billion to help a successful candidate get the 300 million dose.

A spokeswoman for AstraZeneca said the disease was a “single event” and that they were committed to the safety of participants and their testing.

“Diseases occur by accident in large trials, but this should be carefully reviewed and independently reviewed,” the spokesman said.

“We are working to expedite the review of a single event to minimize any impact on the test timeline.”

You May Also Like

Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *