Brexit: The Prime Minister has set an October 15 deadline for the EU trade agreement

Brexit: The Prime Minister has set an October 15 deadline for the EU trade agreement

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The Prime Minister would say that concluding negotiations with the EU without concluding an agreement is still a “good outcome”

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to say that if no trade agreement is reached between the EU and the UK by October 15, both sides will have to “accept it and move forward.”

Mr Johnson would say leaving the EU without a trade deal was still a “good outcome”.

This comes after the UK’s chief negotiator, David Frost, said “Not afraid” to leave the UK.

Another round of talks – the eighth – is set to begin on Tuesday.

But before the talks, The Financial Times reports that the UK plans new legislation that violates key parts of the Brexit withdrawal agreement. Made last year.

The new bill would remove the legal force of customs in Northern Ireland, which is designed to avoid a tough border with the Irish Republic.

It also violates government assistance rules – sometimes financial aid provided by the government to companies.

Government sources told the BBC the law would be introduced this week, describing it as a “sensible fall-back option” if the rejections were broken.

They said it was “not intended to disrupt the talks”, but a key EU ambassador told the BBC it was “a self-defeating tactic” that could lead to the complete dismantling of trade talks.

On Sunday, Foreign Secretary Dominic Robb said there were two issues to be resolved in the BBC’s Andrew Mar program, including negotiations, fishing rights and rules on state aid.

The Prime Minister is about to say that the time has come to find a solution before December 31, when Britain’s transition period ends. Although the UK left the EU on January 31, it still adheres to certain EU rules when negotiating a trade agreement.

“We are now entering the final stages of our negotiations with the EU,” Mr Johnson is expected to say.

He would say there must be an agreement by the European Council on October 15 for it to come into force by the end of this year, so “there is no point in thinking about a deadline beyond that point”.

“I do not see a free trade agreement between us if we can not agree on that. We both need to accept it and move forward,” Mr Johnson said.

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Media headlineThe BBC’s Jonathan Blake breaks down the next round of Brexit talks

The UK has said it wants to strike An agreement with the European Union similar to Canada. But Mr Johnson would say there was no agreement to “trade with the EU, such as Australia,” using trade ethics set by the World Trade Organization.

“As we have said from the beginning, I want to be clear that this will be a good decision for the UK,” he said.

“We are ready for it at our borders and at our ports,” he said Groups representing road users have warned that the UK is “sleeping into disaster”.

‘Always ready to talk’

“We have full control over our laws, our rules and our fishing water,” Mr Johnson said.

“We have the freedom to make trade deals in every country in the world. As a result, we will prosper tremendously.”

Even if no agreement is reached, the Prime Minister will say that the UK will “always be ready to talk to our EU friends”, finding “prudent accommodations on practical matters” including aircraft, truck transport and scientific cooperation.

“Even at this late stage,” he would say, “there is still an agreement” if the EU is willing to reconsider its position.

“But we cannot and will not compromise on the basis of what it means to be an independent nation to get it.”

EU chief negotiator Michael Barnier previously suggested The end of October is the “strict deadline” for finalizing a contract Next year.

He has shown “openness to compromise”, but said the UK would have to “move” if it wanted to avoid the consequences of not having any deal.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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