Opponents of racial justice and armed militant groups confront each other

Opponents of racial justice and armed militant groups confront each other

Opponents of racial justice Opponents of armed white militant groups confront each other in Louisville on Saturday ahead of the Kentucky Derby.

The clash at Jefferson Square Park in Kentucky came amid a large police presence, including the state National Guard and state police.

Some protesters at the scene chanted “Prona Taylor”, the name of a 26-year-old emergency medical technician who was assassinated during a police raid, while protesters repeatedly said “America.”

Guy confronts a Black Lives Matter activist on September 5, 2020, the day of the Kentucky Derby horse race in Louisville, an extreme right-wing activist and self-described militant member.Brian Wolston / Reuters

The confrontation seemed tense, but mostly quiet. It was broken by the arrival of riot police.

Thousands of protesters are expected to march outside Churchill Towns Kentucky Derby Seeking justice for Taylor, who was killed during a police raid on his home in March.

In addition, a group of armed black fighters called the Knot F *** ing Around Coalition (NFAC) said it was also planning a fight.

The armed white angry Viking group also said it would show support for police.

Lavida Chaos, deputy head of the Louisville Metro Police Department, said: “We are ready for others to express their first-amendment rights. We do not know how large this crowd will be, but we do not want to interfere in non-violent legal demonstrations. ”

He also said that fencing around Churchill Towns is something that is done every year for congregation management.

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But some residents criticized the law enforcement’s overreaction to the protests.

“It’s funny to come out here and see armored vehicles, miles around,” Pastor Timothy Findly Jr. said Friday.

Extreme right-wing activists and self-described militant members and Black Lives Matter activists fight on September 5, 2020, the day of the Kentucky Derby horse race in Louisville, Kentucky.Brian Wolston / Reuters

The tension is high The state attorney general is continuing to investigate Taylor’s death in Louisville, and some residents say owning a Kentucky derby is insensitive and distracting from the current demand for justice. (NBC broadcasts Derby every year.)

Some protesters seeking justice for Prona Taylor have called for the cancellation of the Kentucky derby this year.

Churchill Downs published one Report Thursday supported his decision to move forward with the race, but acknowledged concerns about injustice.

“Churchill Towns is committed to engaging in tough conversations within our city, our sport and our own organization,” the report says. “We are committed to taking real and decisive action to improve corporate roadblocks. The much-needed changes for the United States.”

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said Wednesday that “ethnic justice is a goal we all support. We support First Amendment rights. We must balance the right to protest with our essential duty to protect public safety.”

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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