Bad Aston Martin V8 Vantage attacked by dead fish and pays for owner’s sins

Bad Aston Martin V8 Vantage attacked by dead fish and pays for owner's sins

Call a car a classic case of paying for its owner’s sins: a beautiful, white Aston Martin V8 Vantage was attacked by dead fish and the owner drove into the corner after parking it in a place not publicly reserved for the public.

It happened last week in Devon, England, the last time locals took matters of white into their own hands. V8 Vantage Plymouth Live reported that it was parked in private places in Salcomb Fish Quay. The locals gave their own justice as the land was restricted to public use and the owner did not intend to remove it at any time.

The windshield includes two dead fish (since this is a place reserved only for fishermen, you see) and blocking the car with a barrel chains. The latter is said to weigh half a ton. Apparently the owner had planned to skip two parking tickets from the council and keep the car there for a long time. It was, despite that announcement, the location was clear “Reserved for fishermen only.”

It violates the law – and being touchbacks – even if it seems like a childish way for someone to let them know, when it gets in the car, it worked. The same publication says, Aston Martin was sitting there “Many days,” Even after the parking ticket was issued, it was removed after the dead fish attack.

Not only do they see justice being done, but these creative locals can now rejoice in knowing what they can do Latest 007 Humor: This V8 Vantage must be owned by James Bond, who thinks he can leave it in a fisherman’s parking lot. It’s not a brilliant sentence, but it’s the perfect joke to get around the week. Always go out with one Thunder Smile.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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