In Canada, an explorer’s cameras were found on a glacier after 85 years

In Canada, an explorer's cameras were found on a glacier after 85 years
Mario Tama/Getty Images via AFP In 1937, explorers found equipment dropped by famous American photographer Bradford Washburn (pictured: a glacier on Ellesmere Island, Canada, photographed in March).

Mario Tama/Getty Images via AFP

In 1937, explorers found equipment dropped by famous American photographer Bradford Washburn (pictured: a glacier on Ellesmere Island, Canada, photographed in March).

Exploration – Incredible treasure hunt A glacier Canadian. After months of searching, an international team of mountain explorers found the cameras and climbing equipment dropped by famous American explorer and photographer Bradford Washburn in 1937.

Last spring, athletes embarked on an unparalleled mission: to discover an incredible history”State agency Parks said CanadaIn a message posted on Facebook on Friday, October 28.

A team with Teton Gravity Research, a company that specializes in producing videos dedicated to extreme sports, traveled to Kluan Park in the Yukon. This is where they found out hiding place It included Bradford Washburn’s cameras and climbing equipment, which had been trapped in the ice for the last century.

Thirty years of unpublished data for glaciologists

Explorer and professional skier Griffin told Post media People The treasure was discovered only an hour before a helicopter arrived to rescue them. “The moment we saw their equipment was so surreal (…)”He cheered up after several months “Doubts” At the end of their work.

“Buried in the snow since 1937, the hideout contained three historical cameras with photographs of what the mountains looked like 85 years ago.”, explained Teton gravity research on Facebook. The discovery could give glaciologists a 30-year hiatus “Unpublished Data on Glacier Movements”.A company statement says.

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In 1937, Bradford Washburn, along with three other climbers, attempted to climb Canada’s third highest peak, Lucania (5,226 meters), the highest peak ever climbed in North America. A mountaineer, photographer and cartographer, he was also the director of the Boston Museum of Science (Massachusetts), which he founded. He died in 2007.

Facing a descent with extreme conditions, Bradford Washburn and another American climber, Robert Bates, were forced to reduce their equipment to the bare minimum. A discarded item along the way, decades later, becomes a treasure.

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