The James Webb Telescope detects CO2 in an exoplanet’s atmosphere for the first time

The James Webb Telescope detects CO2 in an exoplanet's atmosphere for the first time

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The James Webb telescope has detected the presence of CO2 in the atmosphere of outer space for the first time.

From inventions to inventions. The extremely powerful James Webb Space Telescope has detected the presence of CO2 in the atmosphere of a planet outside our solar system, according to NASA on Thursday, August 25.

Hold your breath – Webb has captured the first clear evidence of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere of a planet outside our solar system! WASP-39 B is a gas giant closely orbiting a Sun-like star about 700 light-years away. https://t.co/FenLqV6HSo pic.twitter.com/abJvqxfLdG

—NASA Webb Telescope (@NASAWebb) August 25, 2022

“Hold your breath,” writes the US space agency, according to which the gas giant WASP-39 b, discovered in 2011, has found precious carbon dioxide, necessary for life. This was the first time that CO2 was detected. A planet outside our solar system.

If life as we know it is impossible, this breakthrough confirms science in finding similar observations on rocky planets.

Sodium, water vapor, potassium…

In addition to CO2, James Webb detected traces of sodium, water vapor and potassium in WASP-39b’s atmosphere, confirming its impressive accuracy. The telescope will now return to other planetary atmospheres, always with the aim of finding out whether the conditions for the emergence of life can be met there.

Last Monday, the astronomical instrument had sent Amazing images of JupiterReveals the aurora of a gas giant.

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About the Author: Seth Sale

"Passionate creator. Wannabe travel expert. Reader. Entrepreneur. Zombie aficionado. General thinker."

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