Curiek was convicted of misrepresenting the recycling power of its coffee capsules.

Curiek was convicted of misrepresenting the recycling power of its coffee capsules.

Curiec Canada will have to pay a $ 3 million fine and $ 800,000 to environmental groups for misleading a section of the country about the possibility of recycling its famous K-Cup pods.

The American coffee company has entered into an agreement with Canada’s competitive bureau, which is investigating “false or deceptive” practices.

“Outside the provinces of British Columbia and Quebec, the Bureau has determined that K-cup pods are not widely accepted by municipal recycling programs at this time,” the government agency said in a statement Thursday.

Curiec Canada has misled consumers in some municipalities by providing an incomplete process for capsule washing steps.

“Curiec Canada’s guidance suggests that consumers can prepare capsules for recycling by removing the seal and emptying the coffee grounds; although some local recycling programs require additional steps to recycle the capsules,” the bureau explained.

In addition to the $ 3.8 million owed, the company will have to repay $ 85,000 for legal costs incurred by the bureau in this case.

Keurig Canada should change the signs and packaging of its K-Cup pods and post corrections on social media and national and local media.

Currick was a pioneer in coffee machine technology that works with small pods.

“In Canada it is illegal to portray products or services as having more environmental benefits than they really are. The false or misleading claims of companies promoting more ‘green’ products affect consumers, who are unable to make informed purchasing decisions, and affect businesses that offer products with less competition and less environmental impact.” Said competition commissioner Matthew Boswell.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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