Gaddy’s company failed to pay

Gaddy's company failed to pay

Is this the end of a great adventure? Caddy, a manufacturer of supermarket trolleys, has announced that it has failed to pay. The Alsace-based group is facing a series of difficulties that have dried up the company’s coffers.

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Cady’s boss, Stephen Dedu, confirmed the news from the newspaper on Monday, January 3. The latest news from Alsace : File a dry treasury and a notice Stop making payments. The trial is set to begin on Tuesday in the Saverne (Bas-Rhin) Judicial Court’s business room to determine the terms of the company’s restructuring.

Stephen Tedou calls for a continuum of events that have massively eroded the treasury. The recessions have accumulated with a significant drop in epidemics and revenues. Although large distribution outlets have been open during various locks, orders have been declining, especially overseas operations. This should include delivery problems and rising prices for raw materials such as steel used to make popular trolleys.

The unions are questioning the risky management of funds provided by public authorities as part of the management of epidemics, especially EMPs, state-guaranteed loans. The file is full of employees because they were not paid in December.

Katie has already enjoyed two legal receipts. The company, which has owned 70% of Polish Tomics for more than three years and now employs 140 people, cut 50 jobs by the summer of 2020 and reorganized Forklift production for mass distribution at the Dettwiller site. (Bas-Rhin).

Born in 1928 and originally specializing in replacing metal wire for chicken feed or salad baskets, Gaddy invented the cart for supermarkets and hypermarkets with an American idea. Like the Frigidaire for refrigerators, its name has become commonplace in the daily lives of consumers. The rise of the consumer society confirmed its growth until 2012, the beginning of difficulties and the date of the first recovery.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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