Discovery of new organ in human body, examination of 12 heads of the dead | Technology | Science | Science News | Malayalam Technology News

Jawbone

Researchers have discovered a new organ in the human body that confirms the presence of undiscovered organs. When you look at your face in the mirror every day you found a new organ next to the jaw bone. The discovery of the new element was published in the academic journal Annals of Anatomy.

A new organ was discovered in the master muscle of the jaw, which was visible during biting and chewing. Until now it was thought that the master muscle had two layers. However, there are already indications that these may have three layers, but so far no clear evidence is available.

This third layer is mentioned in the 38th edition of Grace Anatomy, a British anatomical reference book written by Henry Gray in 1858. An earlier study, published in Germany in 1784 by Grundris der Physiology Fourr vorlesungen, suggested a similar possibility. Researchers at the University of Basel are now developing evidence that the potential for a new element is being explored.

For this, the heads were removed from 12 bodies and stored in a formaldehyde solution for detailed examination. A detailed examination of 16 bodies was also performed by CT scan. The researchers performed MRI scans themselves to gather information about living humans. The results were surprising, said a professor at the University of Basel who was part of the research team. Said Jens Christophe.

He is Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Basel. A team led by Sylvia Messi conducted the study. Only the third layer found can bring the jaw closer to the ear. Researchers have named the new organ Musculus master pars coronidae. This new element is proof that there is still a lot to discover and know in the human body.

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English Summary: Scientists have discovered a new part of the human body – study

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