By default Microsoft collects data from your searches launched on Edge

By default Microsoft collects data from your searches launched on Edge

Microsoft uses its Edge web browser to collect your research data. The US company has implemented a customization option by default very cleverly in its browser to allow it to collect your research data in order to improve its own products.

If you’re using Edge, after a while, the browser will display a pop-up asking Microsoft to help you improve your search.

Redmond has no choice but to accept that the data collected is not associated with you or your device. So the window offers only one button OK Or a button Manage parameter This redirects to the browser’s privacy settings, where the option is embedded among others.

Find out more in the video:

Data was siphoned off regardless of the search engine used

Contrary to many people’s beliefs, this collection is not limited to the claims launched on Bing. On the side Learn more Edge specifies browser settings, Microsoft describes the data it collects ” Derived from searches you do on the Internet, including sites owned or operated by Microsoft In other words, if you use a search engine other than Ping, especially Google, Redmond uses your research.

In detail, the American company interprets this data ” Includes the search query, the search results that appear to you, and the links you make to those search results. “Without further ado, Microsoft mentions more.” Demographic data Can collect.

To put an end to this compulsion as a rule, go Settings Margin, select Confidentiality, research and services In the left column, then go to the section Improved research And option deselection service Help us improve Microsoft products by submitting search results on the Internet.

Source: Cox

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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