Aliens or a natural phenomenon? This is what happens in the depths of a frozen lake

Aliens or a natural phenomenon?  This is what happens in the depths of a frozen lake

UFO enthusiasts believe that the strange noises recorded from the frozen lake are actually signals coming from the base of aliens hidden in the depths, says Scott C. Waring, a well-known name in the community of UFO believers. Lake Lake in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, even provoked military action. Ask yourself and decide:

The document was taken (absolutely true) on December 4 by an employee of the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Service. The crew posted them on Twitter, and later in a post shared on the UFO Sightings Daily, described the noises as “strange sounds of power guns from Star Wars”.

“The Truth Researcher,” Scott c. Warring, reviewing the audio section, said: “White-ball UFOs have been documented and observed by thousands of Colorado residents over the past few years. The signals point to a deep alien base at the bottom of the lake.

He added: “Alien sites are never small. Most of them are located at a depth of 3-6 km and have an area of ​​about 5 km and have their own meteorological system … prone to rain. This is a source of extraction.” 100%. If the signals can go up from the aliens’ base, it will work even if they send the signals down to the base. . He concluded: “But … what do you say to them? In the wrong hands, it could lead to a military response from aliens.” Description of the strange event:

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While it is exciting to think that strange voices came from the site of a secret alien, there is still a plausible explanation for their existence. According to the NPR (United States Public Radio Network), the ice displacement of a frozen lake causes high and low sound frequencies, indirectly due to temperature changes. Award-winning sound artist Andreas Pick wrote in a post on the topic: “Frequencies move through ice, but move faster than low ones, so cracking and mild explosions reach the listener at very significant time intervals. The glycendo goes almost to the bottom.”

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About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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