Tour of Charles Jenks’ strange Cosmic House in London

Architectural Digest France

The Herald of Postmodernism, especially known for his work The language of postmodern architecture Published in 1977, Charles Jenks, an American architect and theorist, made a name for himself. Unusual gardens. Reflecting his fascination with science and cosmology, his Cosmic House was the first postmodern home to be listed in the UK.

Notting Hill is located in the London district and is a collection of code-cosmic references that guided the architect’s life. Renovation work on the house, which began in 1978, is the result of a collaboration between Charles Jenks and his wife, Maggie, and architect Terry Farrell. Contributions by Piers Gough, Eduardo Paolozzi, Michael Graves, Allen Jones, Celia Scott and many more.

From the entrance hall, the Cosmic Oval and its glass doors play with our sense of space. The house is arranged around a central staircase representing the sun, and the rooms on the ground floor bear the names of the seasons. When you browse, you can not be playful, you go from the half moon terrace with the theme of the sundial to the dome-shaped Jacuzzi of Francesco Boromini in Rome.

Today, Lilly Jenks, the architect and director of the Jenks Foundation, exhibits an exhibition entitled After Careful Restoration under the supervision of its owner’s daughter, Lily Jenks. Cosmic, Comic, Cosmetics: Themes and Designs for a Home The archives invite visitors to immerse themselves in originally rejected ideas, paintings that reclaim the history of the place and the influences and collaborations necessary for its creation.

Cosmic House, 19 Lansdowne Walk, London, United Kingdom, www.thecosmichouse.org
Open Wednesday through Thursday, April to December, 12:30 pm to 5 pm.

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At the front of the garden is a representation of the Jenks family with repeated “Jenxiana” motifs around the windows and terraces.

© Sue Bar

On the roof is a new exhibition hall with the scientific evolution of the sun, with floors like the Garden of Time, Malachite, sculptures of Charles and Lily Jenks above.

© Sue Bar

The Water Dome is a jacuzzi designed by Pierce Koff, whose design is based on the inverted dome of Poromini.

© Sue Bar

The Cosmic Oval at the entrance sets the main themes that visitors can see throughout the house.

© Sue Bar

The winter room has a fireplace designed by Michael Graves. Above, bust of Celia Scott of Hephaestus. This overview shows the overview of space with views of spring, summer and fall rooms.

© Sue Bar

The Spring Room has a fireplace designed by Michael Graves, featuring the Three Months of Spring female representation by Penelope Jenks.

© Sue Bar

The chandelier room looks south and overlooks the garden.

© Sue Bar

Charles Jenks’ office has a tent-shaped roof painted to represent the sky.

© Sue Bar

You enter the library through the sunlight staircase. We can see the radial structure of the roof of the library reflected in the form of the sun’s rays.

© Sue Bar

Sunlight blows in a loop in the center of the staircase, making the main rooms accessible at different levels.

© Sue Bar

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