USA: This pace has lived with tires on the neck for many years

France News Live

He has lived with tires around his neck for half of his life. According to the Colorado Nature Park (USA) team, the elk was over four years old and had been stuck in its neck tire for at least two years. On Saturday, wildlife conservation officials were finally unable to shake off the animals for removal.

Trapped for 2 years

I first saw this mousse in 2019 with tires around my neck. When wildlife police inquired about Bicorn sheep and mountain goats in the Colorado forest, one of them saw a moose through a telescope. At the time, the animal probably looked like a two-year-old male.

After that, surveillance cameras photographed the man with the tires twice in 2020, first on June 5 and then on July 12. Another camera filmed him on August 12, 2020.

According to the Colorado Nature Park Service, the elk must have had the tires when they were very young, before the ants formed or when they lost the tires in the winter. A wildlife police officer noticed people feeding on animals that came to place their heads, so he may have sunk his head into a large pile of tires.

Failed attempt

At the end of May and June 2021, four attempts were made to catch the males. Witnesses resumed in early September and early October, near the town of Pine.

Wildlife officials caught the target four times in the past week and tried to calm it down. Their fifth attempt on Saturday was a success. “I was able to get close a few times that night, but other moose and branches blocked the shot. Everything was fine until just before dark. I was able to hit with the spears. After being hit by the spears, the entire herd returned to the dense forest,” said wildlife officer Dawson Swanson, who hunted the animals this evening. .

The effectiveness of tranquilizers is low

The agent then teamed up with his colleague Scott Murdoch for surgery. “Many factors, including men’s physical condition, have reduced the effectiveness of tranquilizers,” explains Dawson Swanson.

“It wasn’t easy because we had to move the tires smoothly,” said colleague Scott Murdoch, who could not cut the tires with the metal inside. Instead, they were forced to remove the horns of animals. He explained about Elk’s mating season.

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Minor injury

If the intervention is difficult, the deer will come out unscathed. “I rubbed my hair a little and opened a small scratch like a coin, but otherwise it’s fine,” said Constable Scott, who thought he was “very shocked.”

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The tires were “filled with wet pine needles and dirt,” the officer continued. In the last two years he has definitely taken “4.5 kilograms of garbage”.

Elk can now live continuously without weight around his neck. Two police officers estimate he lost about 15 kilograms by removing the tire, its corners and debris inside the tire.

This elk story is an opportunity to remind the Colorado Park Authority that “people must respect wildlife and live responsibly.”

One of the things you need to do is make sure your property is free from problems or barriers that could hurt wildlife. Wildlife police have seen deer, moose, bears and other wildlife. Barriers such as swings, stalks, clothes, decorative or Christmas lights, furniture, tomato cages, chicken feed, laundry baskets, football goals, volleyball nets, and, yes, tires, ”they point to the site.

USA: This speed has lived with tires on the neck for many years

Source link USA: This pace has lived with tires on the neck for many years

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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