Competition for World Cup venues will intensify in South America

Competition for World Cup venues will intensify in South America

Only in South America! While qualifying for the World Cup on some continents is boring and predictable, the CONMEBOL campaign is hard to find elsewhere. For example, on Thursday, the team at the bottom of the table spent 100% of an hour against the team at the top of the table on a goal. But in the end, Venezuela was heartbroken overall. In half time, it was brought to Brazil Rabinha For his international debut, and helped Leeds United winger score three goals in the final 25 minutes.

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So Brazil is still at 100% and Venezuela is anchored at the bottom of the table. A shocking victory in Caracas could have started their campaign. This recent defeat certainly puts an end to the far-reaching hopes of organizing their fourth, late rally in a row and seizing a place in Qatar.

Three of the three who lost in the 10th qualifying round on Thursday, which gives a sad read to Chile and Bolivia and Venezuela. But there may be hope in the first two. Chile and Bolivia have played six times on the road and only four times at home. This imbalance will be corrected in the next few days, with two home games on Sunday and Thursday. Chile hosts Paraguay and Venezuela. Bolivia, at extreme heights of La Paz, is home to Peru and Paraguay. These are all winnable matches. So, next Thursday, it’s easy to plan a show where these two latecomers can run again. With two wins, Chile will be in sixth place with Paraguay and Bolivia will be in points draw with the Paraguayans. Beverage supply may be declining, but at least the dim hope lounge will be open for Chile and Bolivia.

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Housing benefits are significant in South America. Bolivia have played five games without a win. But four of them are not. Seven without a Chile win, but not five of them. If they can find shape in front of their own fans – and fans are now returning to South American stadiums – then they can give themselves a chance. There will be a lot more work to do. Sixth place is good for teams currently in eighth and ninth place. But going to the World Cup is not enough. The first four teams qualify automatically, and that team qualifies for the fifth place in the playoffs. Much depends on the slips of the teams at the top of the table. Here, too, there are reasons for countries like Chile and Bolivia to stick to the dream.

First, they hope that Venezuela wins and scares Brazil and gets some points from Ecuador on Sunday the third. And they will be happy to see the fourth and fifth teams currently slipping out of Uruguay and Colombia. It’s a real possibility as they face two greats, Argentina and Brazil, respectively, in the most exciting matches of Sunday’s round.

Welcome back to Argentina Laudaro Martinez For their own game against Uruguay. In Thursday’s goalless draw against Paraguay, the Inter Milan center often missed the front. Argentina displayed their complex passes in midfield, but there was no sharp edge from the penalty area. Despite this, they went close to qualifying and extended a series of defeats that did not extend until the 2019 Copa America semi-finals.

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Uruguay have not lost in the last six rounds of the playoffs, although they have won only two of them. They were stopped by a goalless draw against Colombia on Thursday, but their play in the first half hour was at times quite impressive. Coach Oscar Washington Tabares left his 4-4-2 system Louis Suarez And Edinson Cavani In front. Suarez played in the first half and Gavani, who was in less physical form, gave the team more fluid by playing second in the 4-3-3 formation. Argentina and Uruguay are taking interesting directions in preparation for Qatar 2022, and it will be fascinating to see them go against Buenos Aires.

Colombia have not lost in the last six rounds, however four of them have been in balance and coach Reynolds Ruda is struggling to change the attitude again. James Rodriguez. On Sunday he will be without suspended Juan Quadrato, whose experience and diversity on the right is crucial to the team. Ruda may be inspired to unleash the creative abilities of playmaker Juan Quintero. But even as they line up their squad, Colombia must be a tough test for a Brazilian side who, despite their 100% record, have failed to convince their own supporters.

In 2019, the Brazilian-style campaign opened. Most recently, Coach Tide seems to be in trouble. Nearly halfway through the campaign, Brazil qualified in every way. They have 27 points and 28 is always enough to qualify for the World Cup. However, the coach is under pressure. The defeat to Argentina in the Copa America final three months ago was to no avail. But the team did not impress in the 16th Copa del Rey, with victories over Chile, Peru and Venezuela causing many disappointments, with critics saying the performance level would not be the same. . Colombia should leave, following Uruguay, to say more about Brazil’s chances in Qatar.

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The timing and venue of Sunday’s game are important. Colombia wants to hold their home games in the port city of Barranquilla at 4pm, when the scorching heat dampens their opponents. It can set you back. Of the three titles that South America puts on, there is some time between Game 1 and Game 2 – three days, and a four-day break between Game 2 and Game 3. Colombia had to travel further, crossing almost the entire length of the continent from Montevideo, while Brazil had a short journey from Caracas. Colombians are more likely to run out of gas in the final stages. The flavors of Chile and Bolivia certainly believe so. Their task is to capture Colombia and Uruguay in the finals in Qatar, as they do in the Brazil line-up.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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