U.S. companies say “the vaccine demands jobs.”

U.S. companies say "the vaccine demands jobs."

(New York) In the air or in slaughterhouses, American companies United Airlines and Tyson Foods are required to vaccinate their employees against Covid 19. It works, thus paving the way for the U.S. government-planned immunization requirement for all companies with more than 100 employees.


Juliet Michael
France Media Company

While staff in the United States and the United States had until Monday to certify the vaccine, we marched: 99.5% of those who did not seek medical or religious exemption are now vaccinated.

The company’s boss, Scott Kirby, created an employee and sparked the possibility of vaccinating his employees in January.

He did so in early August, allowing pilots, flight attendants and ground personnel to upload evidence of vaccination until September 27. Otherwise they will be fired.

The company was preparing on Tuesday to lay off 593 people who did not report vaccination status.

She saw the number drop to 320 employees on Thursday after some late downloaders of relevant documents. That number could fall further as workers are invited to layoff talks, United said.

“Our vaccine policy continues to demonstrate that (vaccine) works,” the company commented.

Increased immunity rate

Tyson Foods, a meat company whose operations have been severely disrupted by exposure to pollution at the onset of the epidemic, should be vaccinated at 1 p.m.There is November.

Photo by Michael Conroy, AB

A Tyson Foods plant in Logansport, Indiana

When the new policy was announced in early August, less than half of them were vaccinated.

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One month before the deadline, 91% of people received at least one dose of the vaccine, the company said Thursday.

Other groups, such as Morgan Stanley Bank, oil company Chevron, or technology company Microsoft, must provide proof that they have been vaccinated, all or part of their groups.

But these are often office workers or those who have to travel, work in channels or have no direct contact with customers.

The U.S. Federal Reserve (EEOC), which is responsible for complying with laws against discrimination in the workplace, has the right for employers to vaccinate employees who go to their workplace, regardless of medical or religious opposition.

U.S. President Joe Biden signed an executive order in early September mandating vaccinations for federal employees, who must comply until November 22.

In New York State, caregivers have to be vaccinated from Monday or face the risk of their pay being withheld and fired, up from 87% of them on Wednesday.

In New York, teachers theoretically have to close by Monday, 91% of whom were already on Tuesday.

Terrible tensions

In the coming weeks, Joe Biden ordered the Ministry of Labor to vaccinate or conduct weekly screening tests at companies with more than 100 employees. Details have not yet been announced.

Republican lawmakers Claudia Denny and Jim Banks filed a bill Thursday.

Employees have begun legal action in several U.S. states.

The union, which represents 14,000 American Airlines pilots, has demanded special exemptions for pilots, especially as some fear the side effects of the vaccine could end their lives.

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According to a conference board survey released on Tuesday, nearly two-thirds of big business executives support the government’s plan, but more than half are concerned about how it can be implemented.

“The government should act with caution in view of the intensity of the protests by a quarter of business leaders and the difficulties expected in the process,” said Lori Esposito Murray of the Convention Board.

He warned that if the guidelines were not clear and the goal was not achieved, “it would lead to more tension in the workplace than raising the vaccination rate.”

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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