Greta Dunberg speaks ahead of the German election

Greta Thunberg s'exprime à la veille des élections allemandes

During a visit to a German village threatened by the expansion of a large mine, the general elections ruled by the Swedish activist “are not going to solve the climate crisis.” “It is necessary to mobilize, organize and take to the streets,” he began.

The previous day, he had criticized the German parties for not being enough to reduce global warming.

German environmental activists campaigning on the theme are set to record an increase of 15% on Sunday, up from 8.9% in the previous 2017 legislative elections.

“It gives me hope for the commitment and dedication of everyone who lives here and for the protection of these villages and the fight against climate and environmental destruction,” said the young meteorologist.

She was talking in front of the farm where she last lived in the village, near the Carswheel mine, one of the largest in Europe.

Swedish activist Louisa Neuper, co-founder of Future Future Fighters in Germany, and Accord Hugamp had the motto “Protect the Lottery and Protect 1.5 Degrees”.

“This is to make it clear that any exploitation to burn coal is unacceptable,” Hugamp said.

Although the latest situation in Germany is planned to drop coal by 2038, the Carswheel will continue to expand. Their cause has become the new marching point for the German environmental movement.

In the village, activists have built huts and are preparing for clashes in the coming weeks.

“We are ready to come between machines and homes,” Neubauer said. We learned in the last 16 years of the Merkel era that “change comes from the people”.

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Elsewhere in the region, it may already be too late: the tree is waiting to be swallowed up by the mine. There are only a few houses and lampposts, and the church was demolished in 2018.

Most of the people migrated to a village set up eight kilometers away.

With the withdrawal from nuclear power in 2011, the anti-coal movement gained prominence in Germany.

RWE, the operator of Carswheeler, promises that it will be “necessary from 2024” to supply the underground coal power plants of these communes.

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About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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