Entrepreneurs in Change # 4: The Basic Human Factor

Entrepreneurs in Change # 4: The Basic Human Factor

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As we saw in the previous paragraphs: Entrepreneurial apples and pears, in different dimensions (CO2 Storage and quality of work, for example) … One of these elements is particularly important: the human factor.

In a world that is hungry for a sense of rejuvenation, some people volunteer to contribute to projects that make sense to them. They do not get paid (or very little), but on the other hand, there is plenty of material or social bonding.

A new management model

This trait carries the role of its ups and downs, especially when these volunteers work with active managers (mostly employees).

On the one hand, these volunteers bring goodwill to move mountains, on the other hand, or at no cost, on the other hand, misunderstandings or clumsy risks, because some, after a long time and days, work for a good cause and find themselves. … is empty, and their sense of commitment is somewhat lost.

The solution to this dilemma is not to compensate everyone with hard money: we will fall back into the old-fashioned economy, where everything is a product or service, and we must precisely escape it.

A viable solution is undoubtedly an embracing administration where the rules of engagement are very clear with each other’s expectations.

This challenges the idea of ​​management. Previously, this was often dictated by the interests of the shareholder, who said the new management should be changed to suit more diverse terrain, where an employee would be careful in awarding such a title on his card. Attendance (even without pay), as long as there is an opportunity to influence the group, another person will agree to do pro work.

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Innovative, in the broadest sense of the word

In any business, the human factor is fundamental. In a company in transition, it needs double focus.

I attended the UWE public meeting on Wednesday at Ala Magna in Louvain-la-New. Throughout the talks, entrepreneurs’ testimonials and important news come out, indicating that tomorrow’s business will be very different from what it was 20 years ago … and change is underway.

The most important requirement is “discovery”. Previously, this seemed to be limited to some large companies with their R&D labs. From now on, it seems understandable that any company is called upon to innovate, even the smallest (this can be done through innovation Business model, One of my hobbies since 2010, and stuff My study In Unamur, Yves Bignor and in his footsteps Business model canvas )

Companies such as Tilman, EyeD Pharma, and Alpha Innovations have testified to their innovation efforts, often supported by grants such as DGO6.

An example is shown by Benoit Deboral, the founder of breakthrough technology Aerospacelap : Its plan to launch a nano-satellite galaxy inspired by the US experience at NASA in Silicon Valley, within two years (and with a mobilization of 11 million), the European company capable of playing on this global issue of space, data, and artificial intelligence crossroads.

Environmental change, the third pillar

Behind innovation comes the challenge of environmental change and the circular economy. For too long, the environment has largely been absent from our economic calculations.

More than ever, he gets, among others, through the voice of President Jack Cray Minister-President’s approval , And the support of such actors Alliance Gaya , And Change, And such actions Green deal .

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Again, this is a movement that affects every business and every entrepreneur. Salvador Ianello, CEO of Chocladier Collar, explained to me how they fundamentally revisited this “classic” profession with strong values ​​and understood it better over time.

In the end, the decisions of Managing Director Olivier de Vosage together give direction. UWE will continue to balance these three pillars: environmental concern, economic profit, and social balance.

With ambition “Give Walonia a new face“, In the words of the Minister-President.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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