In London, endangered rebel sirens challenge police

In London, endangered rebel sirens challenge police

Activists of the Environmental Movement’s Destruction Rebellion (XR) demonstrated outside London’s Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Many environmental activists from the Extermination Rebellion (XR) movement have launched a new campaign in London. Men and women dressed as angels played the scene of being caught by fishing nets from a boat. Outside the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs near Westminster Abbey, activists pretended to be littering on the ground, with police watching. The purpose of the event was to protest against UK maritime policy and the use of tugboats below.

This technique involves trapping marine animals at the bottom of a conical net pulled by a ship. Typically, it is up to 150 meters wide for factory vessels and can catch about 60 tons of fish in twenty minutes. Boats can tow them for up to three hours. For Ifremer, there is no drag option. “In most fisheries, this gear catches different sizes and shapes at the same time. .It captures everything in its path (whatever it is), destroys habitats and emits buried carbon .The cabin below releases more greenhouse gases than an airplane, ”the destructive rebel tweeted.

To read:Thousands of destructive rebel activists took to the streets of London

Since the end of August, the radical environmental movement in London has been using what it calls “civil disobedience” to highlight the inaction of governments in the face of climate change. Protesters are particularly demanding that the British government stop all investment in fossil fuels, while the United Kingdom is set to host the UN Climate Conference COP26 in Glasgow (Scotland) in November. Many environmentalists believe the meeting will be the last chance for world leaders to agree on radical policies to prevent global warming. “Severe warning” from IPCC in early August.

Any breeding is prohibited

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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