Mars: An immovable image of a great discovery

Planeta Marte santuri

The European Space Agency has unveiled an incredibly new image released by ESA to reveal an important discovery that will greatly affect the orbits of Mars. In particular, the ESA recorded an impressive image of a vast area of ​​Mars affected by volcanic activity, and within the remnants of this process there may be traces of how mankind could have survived.

Mars is recorded in the Elysium Planetia region, passing through craters about 1000 km long and 2 km thick in some parts of the surface. Their depth can reach several hundred meters, according to the ESA, which is currently trying to analyze images created on Mars to determine what the composition of the soil in that area is due to volcanic activity.

Mars: An immovable image of a great discovery

Volcanic craters on Mars
Photo: ESA / Roscosmos / CaSSIS.

Mars has many impact craters with various objects from space, but the ESA has focused on craters created by volcanic activity, which is the source of possible exploration missions. The ESA cannot see very deep beneath the surface of Mars, so it is difficult to say what secrets are currently hidden there, as images taken from higher altitudes could not provide much information about the seismic activity.

“The two parallel blue trenches in this picture, called Cerberus foceae, are believed to have been formed by tectonic processes that run for nearly a thousand kilometers in the volcanic region. Filled with coarse sand, probably composite basalt, which appears in blue in the false mixed film CaSSIS, the nearby flat volcanic plains are punctured by small impact craters that may expose the same basaltic material we see in the Cerberus fossae.

Mars is going to be a “home” for astronauts after 2030 because there are so many missions ready to get people there quickly. Until then, both ESA and NASA have been trying to uncover as many secrets of Mars as possible, so images like this will continue to appear because they could reveal so much information about what is happening now.

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Meanwhile Mars has been visited by various space explorers, but with many robots, including drones, mankind’s interest in this planet is surprisingly high.

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About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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