In the face of online hatred, Twitter is introducing “security mode”

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The U.S. company announced Wednesday that social networking site Twitter will launch a “safe mode” to reduce “disruptive reactions” and make conversations “healthier”.

Certainly, this “security system” a The feature that temporarily blocks accounts that use “malicious language” for seven days Such as insults, hateful comments, or “repeated and unsolicited comments.” “Authors of tweets that are malicious or unsolicited by our technology will be automatically blocked, meaning that they will not be able to temporarily monitor your account, view your tweets or send you direct messages.», Detailed Twitter Connected.

Twitter said it consulted with experts on online security, mental health and human rights when making the tool and made changes accordingly. This new feature has been pre-tested by a small number of users, with female journalists and members of other groups often being targeted for abuse.

Twitter continued in France

Like other social media giants, Twitter allows users to report posts that they consider offensive, including racist, homosexual, and sexual posts. But many users have been complaining for a long time Holes in Twitter’s policy allow violent and discriminatory comments to be online in many cases.

The site is remarkable It was pursued by six anti-discrimination groups in France The company accuses it of “continuous” failures to prevent hateful comments. French judges ordered Twitter in July, within two months, documents describing ways to combat hate online.

Twitter’s announcement comes just weeks after rival Instagram (a Facebook subsidiary) released new tools to deal with misleading and racist content, following a series of hate comments. Against the black football players of the England team During the euro.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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