Contaminants were discovered in new volumes of the Moderna vaccine

Des impuretés ont été repérées dans plusieurs lots de vaccin.

Last Thursday, the Japanese government decided to discontinue three batches (1.63 million doses) of the US vaccine.

Okinawa and Kunma areas in Japan stopped injecting the Moderna vaccine against Kovit-19 on Sunday, after new contaminated blocks were discovered, local officials announced. Already last Thursday, the Japanese government decided to suspend three vaccines (1.63 million doses), highlighting the presence of foreign substances in quantities from several vaccination centers. According to local media, the locations of Saturday’s suspension in Okinawa are different from those affected by the previous suspension. The province of Kunma, north of Tokyo, said it had stopped using polluted blocks. But the use of modern modules unaffected by the incident continues.

The Japanese Ministry of Health has launched an investigation into the deaths of two men, aged 30 and 38, who were vaccinated with the Moderna vaccine from one of the three constituencies suspended last week. Non-infected patients died within three days of the second injection. The charged quantities include a block identified as contaminants and two adjacent blocks produced in the same place and simultaneously. Both victims were vaccinated at one of these nearby locations for their second injection.

The Japanese Ministry of Health states that the cause of the two deaths has not yet been established: “The causative link of the vaccine is unknown to date.” The US company Moderna speculates that the problem stems from the production line of its subsidiary Rovi in ​​Spain, which produces Covit-19 vaccines for markets outside the United States. Rowe is investigating the cause of the pollution in these blocks, which were distributed only in Japan on Thursday.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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