City of London recovers heat generated on underground trains to heat its population

City of London recovers heat generated on underground trains to heat its population

In a particularly complex ecological environment, large cities around the world are trying to control their impact, especially by reducing their energy consumption. This is the case London, Which sets up a system that meets domestic needs by recovering heat from metro trains, where temperatures can rise to 40 degrees.

Credit: Julius Keelitis / Shutterstock

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The joint venture between Islington County Transport to London (here RATP equivalent, editor’s note) and specialty firm Rampol aims to provide heat to more than 1,000 homes in the coming months. The latter comes from the North Line, one of the lines of the London Underground. This original and innovative use of high temperatures created by the crowding of people on trains is possible by setting up routes between Angel and Old Street stations. These will enable the redistribution of heat losses in the existing Islington supply network, thus meeting the requirements. Heating And hot water.

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This is a definite example of what is known as “district warming” or the development of combined heat from industrial production, power plants, rivers, and widespread heat losses from natural and human sources. In the future, it will be an economic solution that can be used more than today. The Greater London Authority, the administration responsible for the social, energy and economic management of Greater London, will enable this revolutionary process to soon meet 38% of the heating needs of the population. Progress does not stop there! In fact, the system also has the advantage of being upside down in order to upgrade stations. Metro In the summer.

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By acting in this way, the city of London is paving the way for all major accumulations, which are advised to do the same to minimize their impact on the environment. Going even further, English Capital has announced a ban on gas heating for all new homes from 2025. Isn’t that interesting?

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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