Microsoft launches its Assyrian government top secret offer

Microsoft on Monday announced the launch of Azure Government Top Secret, a cloud service for government agencies that need to manage data classified as top secret. The offer has been launched with more than 60 services, and many more are promised soon.

503 of the Intelligent Community Directorate (ICD), a set of policies for computer systems used by spy agencies, has been approved by Microsoft to operate the Azure Top Secret government infrastructure. The company has also approved accredited facilities to meet ICD 705 standards for physical and technical safety.

The key secret of the Azure government, released last December, is giving customers access to geographically diverse areas. This will help meet the data residency requirements and ensure business continuity and flexibility. This offer is designed for United States secret classified workloads.

An integrated approach

The service joins the family of Azure clouds that exist for US government users, including the Azure government and the Azure government secret, and the Azure public cloud. The portfolio, created in collaboration with the US government, aims to cover data at all taxonomic levels, whether it is on campus, in the cloud or on the tactical edge. The Department of Defense, along with the U.S. intelligence community and federal agencies, is already using Azure products.

The Azure government portfolio includes access to all data classifications for the Azure Security Center and the Azure Sentinel. It provides users with an integrated approach to cyber security, with the ability to integrate different security point solutions to analyze and protect resources in Azure and other contexts.

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Microsoft claims to have added new services to the Azure government secret, including the Azure Kubernades service (AKS), Azure operations and the Azure App service. There are now 73 services in the government secret cloud.

Although Microsoft has a long-standing relationship with the U.S. Department of Defense and intelligence services, the company has recently experienced some major setbacks. After many years with Amazon Web Services, Microsoft lost the initially winning contract for a $ 10 billion, 10-year JTI deal. Meanwhile, Microsoft last month opposed the NSA awarding a cloud deal to AWS.

Source: ZDNet.com

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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