There is no health pass for public places

BFMTV

The left-wing leader pointed out that despite the recent increase in infections as part of Mexico’s third wave of Covid 19 cases, the number of deaths has decreased due to the progress of the vaccine.

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lபpez Obrador on Monday rejected the use of a health pass to access public places despite the Covid 19 epidemic.

The need for such certification has provoked protests in European countries since its inception.

“As for Mexico, we are not going to ask for this type of certification, it is very clear, but on the other hand we will make sure there is no pollution,” the president announced during his speech. From Puerto Vallarta, western Mexico.

On Saturday, more than 200,000 people in 100,000 French cities protested against the health pass, restricting access to cultural and social activities by the French government only to those who had been vaccinated or recently tested negative for Covid 19. .

Health restrictions sparked protests in Germany on Sunday, where hundreds of people took to the streets of Berlin.

“The best thing to do is get vaccinated”

The left-wing leader pointed out that despite the recent increase in infections as part of Mexico’s third wave of Covid 19 cases, the number of deaths has decreased due to the progress of the vaccine.

“The best thing to do is get vaccinated,” said Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, however, Mexican state governments have the power to establish their own preventive measures.

In Mexico, with a population of 126 million, about 47.4 million people have been vaccinated, 25.7 million of whom already have a complete immunization schedule (one or two doses, depending on the vaccine).

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According to official statistics, this Latin American country is the fourth most infected country in the world with Covid 19 epidemic, with 2.85 million confirmed cases and 241,034 deaths.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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