San Lorenzo’s tears are back: when and how to see them

San Lorenzo's tears are back: when and how to see them

Return Meteor rain The most anticipated of the year, now know: le Pericardium, Known as Tears of San Lorenzo, Over the next few days they will plow the night sky with their glowing paths. NASA cameras have already passed one on July 26th Recorded and photographed sunlight earlier this month.

In the Northern Hemisphere, so in Italy, it will be This evening you can already attend the astronomy show “Shoot Stars” from 22.00 to 4.00 in the morning. The peak of visibility is expected, however Every night from August 11 to 12, the sky passes by a hundred paths of light visible to the naked eye every hour.. Also look at August 8th, the day the moon enters the lunar phase so it will not be so bright because its hemisphere is completely in shadow from the earth; So it would be easy to spot San Lorenzo’s tears.

During the summer (from late July to August 20) there is nothing more pericytes than the mass of meteorites crossing the Earth in its orbit around the sun. Especially that Concentration of particles and debris left in orbit past the comet Swift-Dutt (Its last passage in the Perihelion dates back to 1992) It reaches the atmosphere at a speed of 225 thousand km / h, warms and considers its appearance At night the light lines are clearly visible. Perseids derives their name from the constellation Perseus, which contains radiation, which appears to be coming from a cluster of meteors.

For optimal view of meteor shower, NASA recommends Abandon urban centers and choose a place surrounded by nature, so the city is far from light pollution. Those who live in metropolitan areas or are particularly unable to attend live shows such as glowing spots can follow the Perseid crowd in streaming on NASA’s social pages. Appointment at night from August 11 to 12, eyes towards the sky or towards the PC monitor (a less romantic approach).

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Photo credit: NASA / Bill Ingalls

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About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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