Covid 19: Highly isolated Australia caught by virus

Govt-19: Highly isolated Australia caught by virus

Five million people in the Sydney metropolitan area learned Wednesday, July 28, after already serving a month in prison. The move was extended to four weeks. If possible, they should be telecommunicated and at home, except for refueling and treatment. Other parts of New South Wales and neighboring Victoria and South Australia – half of 25 million Australians, They are coming out of prison, but not sure if they will return soon …

Yet the country shows dream figures. 33,000 cases and 921 deaths only Govit-19 Since the onset of the epidemic. But now, since June 25, the delta variant shell has been pierced. Brief “punch” prisons, ordered for a few cases in an entire city, no longer work.

Some were vaccinated

Sydney recorded 177 new infections on Wednesday. It may seem small, but it is higher than ever. The progress of the cases marks the failure of the “Zero Covid” strategy. Until now, it worked, thanks to the benefit Australia has enjoyed: it is an island, with easy access to major airport access. Boundary closures were severe, compulsory isolation for visitors: ten days in dedicated hotels. Nearly 400,000 people, including Australians abroad, have complied with the weekly entry quota!

Even the best system has its drawbacks, in this case workers who are not vaccinated, poorly protected and poorly tested, manage isolated arrivals. Health studies show that it was through them that Delta ambushed at the end of June.

The big problem is that Australia, which has taken refuge from its “bubble”, is not mobilized to vaccinate and is in the last position of the big rich countries. As of July 27, only 13.5% of Australians are fully protected (45% in France). The government is severely criticized. It took a long time to realize that the shares of AstraZeneca would not find takers and finally ordered the Pfizer and Moderna sizes.

See also  Hippies: Strong Brix de America!

You May Also Like

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *